Awschalom Group

Spintronics, solid-state quantum information, and nanoscale sensing

Our group has active research activities in optical and magnetic interactions in semiconductor quantum structures, spin dynamics and coherence in condensed matter systems (“spintronics”), macroscopic quantum phenomena in nanometer-scale magnets, and implementations of quantum information and sensing in the solid state.

 

Principal Investigator

David Awschalom

awsch@uchicago.edu

Spin Dynamics and Quantum Information Processing in the Solid State

Our group is primarily concerned with understanding electron and nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors and engineering quantum states for information processing and sensing applications. Our experimental program combines quantum optics with electron-spin resonance, materials engineering, and nanofabrication. We are focused on developing experimental tools and uncovering new systems that could expand the technological impact of quantum coherence in the solid state. Certain point defects in semiconductors, such as the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond or the neutral divacancy in silicon carbide, exhibit long-lived spin coherence that persist up to room temperature. Harnessing these defects as atomic-scale probes of electromagnetic fields promises to lead to nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance, new tools for bio-sensing, and a better understanding of semiconductor electronics.

To read more about our studies, explore the links below:

Quantum Information Processing in Diamond

The fundamental quantum-mechanical nature of spin makes it an ideal candidate for use as a quantum bit, the basic unit of information in a quantum computing architecture. Individual spins may be initialized, coherently controlled, and read out using a variety of optical and electronic techniques. In particular, point defects in crystals have many analogous properties to atoms trapped in vacuum, including localized electronic states and sharp optical and spin transitions. In certain defects, electronic spin states are insulated from lattice dynamics, leading to long quantum coherence times that persist even up to room temperature.

Spin Control in Silicon Carbide and Other Materials

We are exploring defects in a variety of wide-bandgap materials, such as the divacancy in silicon carbide (SiC). We investigate these defects for both fundamental and applied studies of quantum information processing as well as for developing hybrid quantum systems and nanoscale sensing.

Entanglement and control of single quantum memories in isotopically engineered silicon carbide

A. Bourassa, C. P. Anderson, K. C. Miao, M. Onizhuk, H. Ma, A. L. Crook, H. Abe, J. Ul-Hassan, T. Ohshima, N. T. Son, G. Galli, D. D. Awschalom. Entanglement and control of single quantum memories in isotopically engineered silicon carbide. arXiv. 2020. 2005.07602.

Universal coherence protection in a solid-state spin qubit

K. C. Miao, J. P. Blanton, C. P. Anderson, A. Bourassa, A. L. Crook, G. Wolfowicz, H. Abe, T. Ohshima, D. D. Awschalom. Universal coherence protection in a solid-state spin qubit. arXiv. 2020. 2005.06082.

Developing silicon carbide for quantum spintronics

N. T. Son, C. P. Anderson, A. Bourassa, K. C. Miao, C. Babin, M. Widmann, M. Niethammer, J. U. Hassan, N. Morioka, I. G. Ivanov, F. Kaiser, J. Wrachtrup, D. D. Awschalom. Developing silicon carbide for quantum spintronics. Appl. Phys. Lett.. 2020. Vol. 116. Pg. 190501.

Vanadium spin qubits as telecom quantum emitters in silicon carbide

G. Wolfowicz, C. P. Anderson, B. Diler, O. G. Poluektov, F. J. Heremans, D. D. Awschalom. Vanadium spin qubits as telecom quantum emitters in silicon carbide. Science Advances. 2020. eaaz1192.

Optically addressable molecular spins for quantum information processing

S.L. Bayliss, D.W. Laorenza, P.J. Mintun, B. Diler, D.E. Freedman, D.D. Awschalom. Optically addressable molecular spins for quantum information processing. arXiv. 2020. 2004.07998.

High-Q Nanophotonic Resonators on Diamond Membranes using Templated Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2

A. Butcher, X. Guo, R. Shreiner, N. Delegan, K. Hao, P. J. Duda III, D. D. Awschalom, F. J. Heremans, A. A. High. High-Q Nanophotonic Resonators on Diamond Membranes using Templated Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2. arXiv. 2020. 2004.03532.

Purcell enhancement of a single silicon carbide color center with coherent spin control

A. L. Crook, C. P. Anderson, K. C. Miao, A. Bourassa, H. Lee, S. L. Bayliss, D. O. Bracher, X. Zhang, H. Abe, T. Ohshima, E. L. Hu, D. D. Awschalom. Purcell enhancement of a single silicon carbide color center with coherent spin control. Nano. Lett.. 2020. Vol. 20. Pp. 3427.

Epitaxial Er-doped Y2O3 on silicon for quantum coherent devices

M. K. Singh, A. Prakash, G. Wolfowicz, J. Wen, Y. Huang, T. Rajh, D. D. Awschalom, T. Zhong, S. Guha. Epitaxial Er-doped Y2O3 on silicon for quantum coherent devices. APL Materials. 2020. Vol. 8, Pg. 031111.

Coherent control and high-fidelity readout of chromium ions in commercial silicon carbide

B. Diler, S. J. Whiteley, C. P. Anderson, G. Wolfowicz, M. E. Wesson, E. S. Bielejec, F. J. Heremans, D. D. Awschalom. Coherent control and high-fidelity readout of chromium ions in commercial silicon carbide. npj Quantum Inf 6, 11 (2020).

Spatiotemporal mapping of photocurrent in a monolayer semiconductor using a diamond quantum sensor

B. B. Zhou, P. C. Jerger, K.-H. Lee, M. Fukami, F. Mujid, J. Park, D. D. Awschalom. Spatiotemporal mapping of photocurrent in a monolayer semiconductor using a diamond quantum sensor. Phys. Rev. X. 2020. Vol. 20, Pg. 011003.

View All Publications
Name Institution
Paul Alivisatos University of California, Berkeley
Dimitri Basov University of California, San Diego
Guido Burkard University of Konstanz
Andrew Cleland University of Chicago
David DiVincenzo RWTH Aachen
Viatcheslav Dobrovitski Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University
Philip Feng Case Western Reserve University
Michael Flatté University of Iowa
Adam Gali Budapest University of Technology and Economics
Ronald Hanson TU Delft
Evelyn Hu Harvard University
Ania Bleszynski Jayich University of California, Santa Barbara
H. Jeff Kimble California Institute of Technology
Jeremy Levy University of Pittsburgh
Daniel Loss University of Basel
Roberto Myers The Ohio State University
Hideo Ohno Tohoku University
Joe Orenstein University of California, Berkeley
Oskar Painter California Institute of Technology
Chris Palmstrøm University of California, Santa Barbara
Dan Rugar IBM Almaden Research Center
Nitin Samarth Pennsylvania State University
Thomas Schenkel Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Darrell Schlom Cornell University
David Schuster University of Chicago
Chris van de Walle University of California, Santa Barbara
Stephan von Molnar Florida State University
Ali Yazdani Princeton University
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  • Agnetta Cleland
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    Graduate Student Alumni; Department of Physics, The Ohio State University
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    Postdoctoral Alumni; Credit Suisse, Zurich
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    Undergraduate Student Alumni; Department of Applied Physics, Harvard University
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    Graduate Student Alumni; Department of Physics, The Ohio State University
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    Postdoctoral Alumni; Department of Physics, The Ohio State University
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    Graduate Student Alumni; Postdoctoral Alumni; Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania
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    Graduate Student Alumni Google Inc., Santa Barbara, California
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    Undergraduate Student Alumni; Department of Physics, Harvard University
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    Postdoctoral Alumni; Department of Physics, University of Pittsburgh
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    Postdoctoral Alumni; Max Planck Institute, Stuttgart
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    Graduate Student Alumni; Naval Research Laboratory
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    Graduate Student Alumni Freedom Photonics, Santa Barbara, California
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    Graduate Student Alumni; Dupont Research, DE
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  • Felix Mendoza
    Graduate Student Alumni; TILL I.D. GmbH, Munich, Germany
  • Maiken Mikkelsen
    Graduate Student Alumni; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University
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    Graduate Student Alumni; Postdoctoral Alumni; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University
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    Graduate Student Alumni; Quantum Computing Research, Northrop Grumman Corporation
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    Graduate Student Alumni; Applied Materials, Santa Clara, California
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    Postdoctoral Alumni; Department of Physics, University of Maryland
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    Undergraduate Student Alumni; Marshall, Gerstein & Borun, Chicago, Illinois
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    Graduate Student Alumni; Department of Physics, University of Basel
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  • Gian Salis
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  • Jing Shi
    Postdoctoral Alumni; Department of Physics, UC Riverside
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    Graduate Student Alumni; Department of Physics, University of Michigan
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    Postdoctoral Alumni; IBM Almaden Research Center
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    Postdoctoral Alumni; Department of Physics, University of Victoria
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    Graduate Student Alumni; Postdoctoral Alumni; Thinsilicon Corporation
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    Graduate Student Alumni Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University
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    Graduate Student Alumni; Department of Computer Science, UC Berkeley
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Spintronics

Spintronics, the storage and transport of electronic spins in semiconductor devices may revolutionize the electronic device industry, with spin based transistors, memories, and opto-electronic devices replacing their charge-based counterparts. For instance, giant and tunnel magnetoresistance effects are already used in modern hard drives, and non-volatile spin-logic devices are being studied for inclusion in future computers. Ultimately, spintronics could bring practical logic and memory down to the single electron spin level.

Magnetic Semiconductors

The exchange couplings present in magnetically-doped semiconductors are orders of magnitude larger in energy than the spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions, and the interactions between carriers and magnetic ions in magnetic semiconductors may be engineered through heterostructures grown with molecular beam epitaxy.

Measurement Techniques

Spin phenomena may be quantified to a striking degree of precision using a variety of optical and electronic techniques that enable one to probe spin dynamics as a function of time and space.

Developing silicon carbide for quantum spintronics

Atomic layer deposition of titanium nitride for quantum circuits

Opportunities for basic research for next-generation quantum systems

Optical manipulation of the Berry phase in a solid-state spin qubit

Optical Polarization of Nuclear Spins in Silicon Carbide

Isolated electron spins in silicon carbide with millisecond coherence times

Ultrafast optical control of orbital and spin dynamics in a solid-state defect

Electrically Driven Spin Resonance in Silicon Carbide Color Centers

A quantum memory intrinsic to single nitrogen–vacancy centres in diamond

Spintronics without magnetism

Spintronics, Volume 82

J. Berezovsky*, M. H. Mikkelsen*, et al., Science 320, 349, (2008) / R. Hanson, et al., Science 320, 352, (2008)

Anisotropic interactions of a single spin and dark-spin spectroscopy in diamond

Observation of the Spin Hall Effect in Semiconductors

Optical and electronic manipulation of spin coherence in semiconductors

Spintronics

Semiconductor Spintronics and Quantum Computation

Ultrafast Manipulation of Electron Spin Coherence

Electron Spin and Optical Coherence in Semiconductors

Lateral drag of spin coherence in gallium arsenide

Grant sets up long fibers in our basement for the quantum LAN, 2020

Chicago Quantum Exchange, 2019

Tommy La Stella visits the lab, 2018

Revolution Brewing, 2016

The past and present melt together, Himeji Castle, 2016

Complete photo gallery