Event: Protein Analogous Micelles: Varied Multi-Functional Nanoparticles for Diagnostics and Therapeutics

Date

April 21 - 2011
All Day Event

Location

The University of Chicago

Details

A Colloquium with Pritzker Director Matthew Tirrell

Matthew Tirrell, founding Pritzker Director of the University of Chicago’s new Institute for Molecular Engineering, visited the University prior to starting his new role to give a talk on his research into Protein Analogous Micelles. He discussed the potential diagnostic and therapeutic properties of these molecules, as well as potential hurdles to overcome.

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Multivalent Interaction in Polyelectrolyte Systems - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Multivalent Interaction in Polyelectrolyte Systems

Date

July 18 - 2011
All Day Event

Location

Argonne National Laboratory

Details

Multivalent electrostatic interactions in systems of charged macromolecules can produce attractive forces between chains that can lead to new opportunities for self-assembly and to the formation of complex coacervate phases. This talk will discuss the quantitative measurement of attractive forces between polyelectrolyte chains in the presence of multivalent counterions using the surface forces apparatus and then proceed to demonstrate how multivalency-induced attractive forces can lead to new structures and interesting phase behavior.

For more information, please contact Patricia D. Canaday at 630.252.5562 or patcanaday@anl.gov

.

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Engineering in a Post Modern World - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Engineering in a Post Modern World

Date

April 3 - 2013
All Day Event

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Dr. John Prausnitz, University of California, Berkeley

Like every profession, chemical engineering must adjust to changing times. Chemical engineering has done so by broadening its range of technical concerns, by giving increased attention to new developments in chemistry, biology and material science. However, that is not enough. To serve society, chemical engineering must also adjust to cultural developments, to changes in the way we live. A useful way to recognize these changes is to look at art and architecture. Some examples are shown to illustrate our postmodern world. This world requires cultures enhanced awareness int the practice of chemical engineering and in the education of future chemical engineers.

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University of Chicago’s Tirrell to Deliver Kurt Wohl Memorial Lecture - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: University of Chicago's Tirrell to Deliver Kurt Wohl Memorial Lecture

Date

April 5, 2013
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Location

102 Colburn Laboratory, University of Delaware, Newark, NJ, USA

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The Women’s Board Luncheon with Matthew Terrill - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: The Women's Board Luncheon with Matthew Terrill

Date

April 9, 2013
11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Location

The Casino, 195 East Delaware Place, Chicago, IL

Details

Registration closed

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Professor Matthew Tirrell, “Protein Analogous Micelles: Versatile, Modular Nanoparticles” - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Professor Matthew Tirrell, "Protein Analogous Micelles: Versatile, Modular Nanoparticles"

Date

April 10 - 2013
All Day Event

Location

New Orleans, LA, USA

Details

One Hundred Years of Micelles Symposium, American Chemical Society Spring Meeting

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Penn State University Colloquium State College, PA - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Penn State University Colloquium State College, PA

Date

April 12, 2013
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Location

Penn State University Colloquium State College, PA

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Mechanisms and Design in Biological Devices: From Cellular Off Switches to Biofuel Production - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Mechanisms and Design in Biological Devices: From Cellular Off Switches to Biofuel Production

Date

April 16, 2013
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

UChicago, Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery, 1st Floor Auditorium, Room 1103

Details

IGSB/IME Special Seminar
Gregory Bokinsky, Ph.D., University of California Berkeley
Abstract: Like every profession, chemical engineering must adjust to changing times. Chemical engineering has done so by broadening its range of technical concerns, by giving increased attention to new developments in chemistry, biology and material science. However, that is not enough. To serve society, chemical engineering must also adjust to cultural developments, to changes in the way we live. A useful way to recognize these changes is to look at art and architecture. Some examples are shown to illustrate our postmodern world. This world requires cultures enhanced awareness int the practice of chemical engineering and in the education of future chemical engineers.

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Professor David Awschalom, Seventh Annual Slichter Lecture, “Beyond Electronics: Abandoning Perfecti - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Professor David Awschalom, Seventh Annual Slichter Lecture, "Beyond Electronics: Abandoning Perfection for Quantum Technologies"

Date

April 17 - 2013
All Day Event

Location

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA

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Technology Management and Licensing for Academia-Industry Alliances (By Invitation Only) - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Technology Management and Licensing for Academia-Industry Alliances (By Invitation Only)

Date

April 17, 2013
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Location

Zar Seminar Room, Crerar Library, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

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Developing a language to Program Cells - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Developing a language to Program Cells

Date

April 17, 2013
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Location

UChicago, Biological Sciences Learning Center, Room 001 (Lower Level)

Details

IGSB/IME Special Seminar
Brynne Stanton, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Abstract: Cells can be exogenously programmed to carry out a variety of coordinated and sophisticated tasks, ranging from complex behaviors to acting as potent therapeutics that directly impact human health. Genetic programs rely on changes in gene expression to execute molecular computation and exhibit control over biological processes. Construction of complex programs requires well-characterized transcriptional regulatory components that behave in an orthogonal fashion to one another, referred to as parts. The lack of reliable parts represents a persistent obstacle in the field of synthetic biology that has limited design capacity and program construction. To expand upon the toolbox of available parts, large-scale “part mining” was applied to develop a library of 73 TetR-family transcriptional repressors gleaned from prokaryotic genomes. To characterize the library, a customized array-based assay was developed to comprehensively determine the DNA binding profile of an individual repressor. Operator sequences obtained via this approach were used to construct synthetic Escherichia coli promoters that are responsive to an individual repressor. Repressor-promoter pairs were examined for orthogonal behavior, integrated into circuits that carry out NOT and NOR logic operations, and systematically combined to produce larger circuits within a single cell. To extend the library’s utility, repressors were reconfigured into mammalian activators and repressors that behave in a robust and reliable fashion. The resulting synthetic mammalian parts can be applied to the construction of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the treatment of human disease. Taken together, this work represents a large set of compatible genetic circuits that can be applied towards the construction of user-defined programs, and provides coordinated computational control to biotechnological and medical applications in both microbial and mammalian cells.

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Bio International Convention - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Bio International Convention

Date

April 22 - April 25, 2013
All Day Event

Location

Chicago, USA

Details

Website: http://convention.bio.org

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Twin Cities Harper Lecture With Matthew Tirrell: The Promise of Molecular Engineering - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Twin Cities Harper Lecture With Matthew Tirrell: The Promise of Molecular Engineering

Date

May 5, 2013
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Location

120 Kellogg Boulevard West, Saint Paul, MN

Details

Join Matthew Tirrell, founding Pritzker director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering (IME), for a look at UChicago’s first engineering program. UChicago’s largest new academic program since the Harris School of Public Policy in 1988, the IME will transform the way engineering is considered and taught.

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“Inflammation, Blood Flow Dynamics and The Design of Vascular Targeted Drug Carriers,” Lola Eniola-A - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: "Inflammation, Blood Flow Dynamics and The Design of Vascular Targeted Drug Carriers," Lola Eniola-Adesfeso, PhD

Date

May 17, 2013
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

Kent 101, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

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“Exascale Computing - Is it for Real?”, Shekhar Borkar - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: "Exascale Computing - Is it for Real?", Shekhar Borkar

Date

May 20, 2013
2:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Location

Ryerson 251, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

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Professor David Awschalom, Keynote Speaker, “Beyond Electronics: Abandoning Perfection for Quantum T - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Professor David Awschalom, Keynote Speaker, "Beyond Electronics: Abandoning Perfection for Quantum Technologies"

Date

May 23 - May 24, 2013
All Day Event

Location

Swiss Nanoscience Convention, Basel, Switzerland

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Charl Faul, “Self-Assembly of Complex and Hierarchical Soft Electroactive Nanostructures - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Charl Faul, "Self-Assembly of Complex and Hierarchical Soft Electroactive Nanostructures

Date

May 28, 2013
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Location

Kent 101, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

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Special Seminar: “Systems Analysis of Mouse Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Vivo at the Single Cell Leve - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Special Seminar: "Systems Analysis of Mouse Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Vivo at the Single Cell Level"

Date

June 3, 2013
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Location

Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery | 1st Floor Auditorium, Room 1103 | 900 E. 57th Street

Details

Rong Lu, PhD, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University

For assistance please contact Julia Woods at (773) 834-5127

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Professor Matthew Tirrell, Uncommon Core Lecture Series: Engineering from Bottom Up - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Professor Matthew Tirrell, Uncommon Core Lecture Series: Engineering from Bottom Up

Date

June 7, 2013
1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Location

The University of Chicago, Social Science Building, Rm 122

Details

Alumni Weekend

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7th International School and Conference on Spintronics and Quantum Information Technology (Spintech - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: 7th International School and Conference on Spintronics and Quantum Information Technology (Spintech VII)

Date

July 29 - August 2, 2013
All Day Event

Location

Chicago, USA

Details

Abstract submission deadline: March 29, 2013


Spintech VII will highlight fundamental physical phenomena related to spin-dependent effects in condensed matter and advances in the development of new spintronic materials, structures, and devices, including quantum information science and concepts. As in past years, the school will take place during the first half of the week to orient newcomers and students to this emerging field, followed by a conference aiming at stimulating the progress in new materials, measurement, and theory of spintronic/quantum information systems.

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Professor David Awschalom, Invited Lecture, First International Pacific Rim Spintronic Materials Sym - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Professor David Awschalom, Invited Lecture, First International Pacific Rim Spintronic Materials Symposium (Prisms): Spintronics with Carbon-Based Materials

Date

August 11 - August 15, 2013
All Day Event

Location

Peking University, Beijing, China

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Distinguished Young Scholar Seminar Series: Stereoregularity Inhibits Complex Coacervation of Poly - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Distinguished Young Scholar Seminar Series: Stereoregularity Inhibits Complex Coacervation of Polypeptides

Date

August 12, 2013
4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Location

University of Washington; Room PAA A102

Details

Sarah Perry, PhD

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Polymer Group Seminar - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Polymer Group Seminar

Date

August 22, 2013
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speakers: Grant Garner, Sarah Perry

Research Groups: de Pablo, Tirrell

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Pattern Formation - A Missing Link in Understanding the complex relationship between ecosystem funct - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Pattern Formation - A Missing Link in Understanding the complex relationship between ecosystem function, biodiversity, and the environment

Date

August 28, 2013
10:30 AM - 12:30 AM

Location

Argonne National Laboratory, Building 362 Room E356

Details

Self-organization processes leading to pattern formation phenomena are ubiquitous in nature. Cloud streets, sand ripples, stone patterns and animal-coat patterns are a few examples. Intensive theoretical and experimental research efforts during the past few decades have resulted in a mathematical theory of pattern formation whose predictions are well confirmed by controlled laboratory experiments. There is increasing observational evidence that pattern formation also plays an important role in shaping dryland landscapes. Depending on the rainfall regime, self-organized vegetation patchiness in the form of nearly periodic spot, stripe and gap patterns has been reported. Supporting these observations are studies of spatially explicit vegetation models that have reproduced many of the observed patterns.

The relevance of spatial heterogeneity to biodiversity is well recognized but the role of self-organized patchiness in driving or modifying this heterogeneity and the concomitant implications on biodiversity and ecosystem function have hardly been addressed. In this talk I will review the state of art in studies of vegetation pattern formation, and delineate manners by which pattern formation processes can affect the relationships between abiotic factors, biodiversity and ecosystem function.

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Polymer Group Seminar - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Polymer Group Seminar

Date

September 5, 2013
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Aaron Fluitt

Research Groups: de Pablo, Nealey

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Inagural BGU-Uchicago Research Grants Announced - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Inagural BGU-Uchicago Research Grants Announced

Date

September 15 - 2013
All Day Event

Location

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Professor David Awschalom, Opening Lecture, Munich Center for Nanosciences Conference on “Nanoscienc - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: "Nanosciences: Great Adventures on Small Scales," Lecture by Professor David Awschalom

Date

September 16 - September 20, 2013
All Day Event

Location

Venice International University, Italy

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IME Seminar 9/19 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar

Date

September 19, 2013
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Jonathan Whitmer, de Pablo Group

Speaker: Dimitris Priftis, Tirrell Group

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Semiconductor Research Corporation Patterning Annual Review (SRC) - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Semiconductor Research Corporation Patterning Annual Review (SRC)

Date

September 24 - September 25, 2013
All Day Event

Location

Gleacher Center

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Advanced Storage Tech Consortium (ASTC) Review - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Advanced Storage Tech Consortium (ASTC) Review

Date

September 26 - September 27, 2013
All Day Event

Location

Biltmore Hotel, Santa Clara, CA

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IME Special Seminar: Robert Eisenberg - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Robert Eisenberg

Date

October 2, 2013
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

IME Special Seminar

 

Dr. Robert Eisenberg

Rush University

"Ions in Channels, Natural Nanovalves"

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IME Social Circle Committee - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Social Circle Committee Meeting

Date

October 3, 2013
3:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Diana Morgan will be leading a meeting to plan IME Social Circle events taking place this quarter. All IME faculty, staff, and students are welcome to contribute their ideas for events.

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IME Seminar 10/3 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar

Date

October 3, 2013
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Tyler Roberts, de Pablo Group

"Stability in confined liquid crystalline systems."


Speaker: Paulina Rincon, Nealey Group

"Origin of Defects in Directed Self-Assembly of Diblock Copolymers Using Feature Multiplication"

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Paul Nealey University of Houston Seminar - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: University of Houston Seminar: Paul Nealey

Date

October 17 - 2013
All Day Event

Location

University of Houston

Details

Speaker: Paul Nealey

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IME Seminar 10/17 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Joshua Lequieu and Matthew Kade

Date

October 17, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Location

KCBD 1103

Details

Speaker: Joshua Lequieu, de Pablo Group

"The Thermodynamics of Pairwise DNA-Nanoparticle Assembly"


Speaker: Matthew Kade, Tirrell Group

"Polymer synthesis for coacervate based materials"

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IME Special Seminar 10/31 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Jacob Israelachvili

Date

October 31, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Jacob Israelachvili, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

"Interactions of soft-particles (vesicles, etc.) in complex fluid systems"

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AIChE Annual Meeting IME Reception - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: AIChE Annual Meeting IME Reception

Date

November 5, 2013
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Location

Hilton San Francisco Union Square

Details

IME will be hosting a reception for our faculty, staff, students, collaborators, and friends at the national AIChE Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

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UChicago-Chicago Convenes - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: UChicago-Chicago Convenes

Date

November 6 - 2013
All Day Event

Location

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MURI Event - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: MURI Event

Date

November 11, 2013
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Location

Gleacher Center

Details

The Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) run by the Department of Defense is hosting an event in Chicago that will include IME Professor Paul Nealey.

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Special Seminar: Sundari Chetty - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Special Seminar: Sundari Chetty

Date

November 11, 2013
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

BSLC Auditorium #001

Details

Speaker: Sundari Chetty
Post Doctoral Fellow
Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology
Harvard University

 

Title: "Regulating the Cell Fate Specification of Pluripotent Stem Cells"

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IME Seminar 11/14 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Christopher Yale and Hyo Seon Suh

Date

November 14, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Christopher Yale, Awschalom Group

"All-optical quantum control of a solid-state spin"

Optically-addressable defects in solids have shown great promise for research efforts in quantum information and metrology.  Here, we discuss an all-optical method to control the spin of one such defect, an individual nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond.  Using the physics of coherent dark states, we demonstrate protocols to initialize, readout, and coherently manipulate that spin state along any quantum basis of our choosing.  These techniques could provide a pathway for studying coherence and quantum information in a wide array of semiconductors and nanostructures.


Speaker: Hyo Seon Suh, Nealey Group

"Offset Block Copolymer Printing"

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Juan de Pablo Harper Lecture - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Juan de Pablo Harper Lecture

Date

November 17 - 2013
All Day Event

Location

Miami

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Purification and Conservation: The Water Research Initiative - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Purification and Conservation: The Water Research Initiative with Steven Sibener

Date

November 22, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Location

BSLC 115

Details

Professor of Chemistry Steven Sibener was recently named Director of the Water Research Initiative at the University of Chicago's new Institute for Molecular Engineering. The Water Research Initiative was formally launched this June with collaborators at Argonne National Laboratory and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. The initiative plans to use nanotechnology to aid in the purification and conservation of water. Dr. Sibener will address questions of water efficiency and share upcoming plans and goals of the initiative.

This event is presented by the University of Chicago's chapter of The Triple Helix.

Refreshments will be served.

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Physics with a Bang! - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Physics with a Bang! Holiday Lecture and Open House

Date

December 7, 2013
11:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Location

KPTC

Details

Students, families, teachers and especially the curious are invited to attend our annual Holiday Lecture and Open House. See fast, loud, surprising and beautiful physics demos performed by Profs. Heinrich Jaeger and Sidney Nagel. Talk to scientists about their latest discoveries. Participate in hands-on activities related to their research.

Kersten Physics Teaching Center - 5720 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL
Lecture repeated at 11am and 2pm
Open House and Demo Alley from 12pm-4pm

Doors for the Lectures open 30 minutes before each show.  Admission to this event is free.  Please note: there will be no online registrations, and will be a first to arrive, first ticketed event.  We do not guarantee availibility of seating, but shows will be streamed live to alternate venues as well.

This event is sponsored by the James Franck Institute, the Department of Physics,  the Insitutue for Molecular Engineering, and the Materials Research Science & Engineering Center.

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MRSEC Special Seminar: Giulia Galli - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Special MRSEC Seminar: Giulia Galli

Date

December 12, 2013
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS E123

Details

The University of Chicago MRSEC presents a special seminar

Speaker: IME Professor Giulia Galli

"Understanding Enigmatic Materials"

Can quantum simulations provide valuable contributions to the understanding of the physical and chemical properties of materials and molecular systems? We will address this question by discussing some specific examples where quantum simulations have been used to predict properties of heterogeneous materials for optimal energy conversion processes. We will also discuss issues related to the comparison of theory and simulations with incresingly complex experiments.

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IME Seminar 12/12 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Tobin Sosnick

Date

December 12, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

IME Fellow Seminar

Speaker: Tobin Sosnick

"Protein folding and design using light-senstive proteins."

The seminar will first discuss a unified approach for simultaneously predicting protein folding pathways and structure using only the amino acid sequence and basic principles of protein chemistry as input. The second part will cover the coupling of light-sensitive proteins to other proteins to control biological processes in vivo.

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IME Seminar 1/9 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Su-mi Hur and Paul Klimov

Date

January 9, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Su-mi Hur, de Pablo Group

Title: "Solvent-Assisted Self-Assembly of Block Copolymer Films"

Solvent annealing has been shown to provide an effective means for controlling the self assembly in block copolymer films; it leads enhanced defects annihilation and also provides opportunities to create structures that cannot be achieved by thermal annealing. We have developed an efficient simulation tool for modeling the solvent annealing of block copolymer films that enables study of the evolution of microstructure and the transformations between various microphases in response to film swelling and solvent evaporation. Especially, conditions that lead to a defect-free copolymer morphology have identified.


Speaker: Paul Klimov, Awschalom Group

Title: "Electrically driven spin resonance in silicon carbide color centers"

We demonstrate that the spin of optically addressable point defects can be coherently driven with AC electric fields. Based on magnetic-dipole forbidden spin transitions, this scheme enables spatially confined spin control and the imaging of GHz-frequency electric fields. While we control defects in SiC, these methods apply to spin systems in many semiconductors, including the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. Electrically driven spin resonance offers a viable route towards scalable quantum control of electron spins in a dense array.

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Physics Department Colloquium: David Awschalom - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Physics Department Colloquium: David Awschalom

Date

January 16, 2014
4:15 PM - 5:30 PM

Location

KPTC 106

Details

The University of Chicago Physics Department Colloquium

Speaker: Professor David Awschalom

Title: Beyond electronics: abandoning perfection for quantum technologies

Our technological preference for perfection can only lead us so far: as traditional transistor-based electronics rapidly approach the atomic scale, small amounts of disorder begin to have outsized negative effects. Surprisingly, one of the most promising pathways out of this conundrum may emerge from recent efforts to embrace defects to construct 'quantum machines.'  Recently, individual defects in diamond and other materials have attracted interest as they possess an electronic spin state that can be employed as a solid state quantum bit at room temperature.  We provide an overview of temporally- and spatially-resolved optoelectronic measurements used to generate, manipulate, and interrogate single electron and nuclear spin states on demand.  The quantum engineering of spins and photons has enabled gigahertz coherent control, nanofabricated spin arrays, nuclear spin quantum memories, and nanoscale imaging for emerging applications in science and technology.

Light Refreshments will be served in KPTC 206 at 3:45pm

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IME Special Seminar: Aashish Clerk - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Aashish Clerk

Date

January 21, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Aashish A. Clerk
Department of Physics
McGill University

Title: "Fun with quantum optomechanics:  dissipative interactions and strong coupling effects"

The field of quantum optomechanics involves the interaction of a mechanical resonator and photons in a cavity.  It has seen remarkable recent progress, and holds considerable promise for both fundamental studies of quantum phenomena, and for applications to quantum information processing.  After giving an introduction to this rapidly evolving field, I will discuss recent theory work exploring new directions in optomechanics.  The first part will focus on directly harnessing dissipation as a powerful way to generate quantum states of light and motion.  In the second part, I will discuss the physics of strong light-matter interactions in a strongly-driven optomechanical system.

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IME Special Seminar: Nathaniel Lynd - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Nathaniel Lynd

Date

January 23, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Nathaniel Lynd
Project Leader, Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis
Materials Sciences Division
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Title: "Recent developments in the synthesis and application of functional polyethers"

The ring-opening anionic polymerization of epoxide monomers provides a versatile platform for synthesizing polyether materials with controlled molecular weights, compositions, and chemical functionalities. The versatility of this polymerization methodology is derived from its ring-strain driving force, which places few restrictions on the exact structure of the epoxide monomer. Analysis of the relative reactivities of epoxide monomers in copolymerization by 1H NMR spectroscopic analysis of comonomer dyad populations, coupled with theoretical insight, provide the practical and conceptual tools required for understanding the trends in reactivity in anionic epoxide copolymerizations. I will describe our efforts in understanding the relative reactivities of epoxide monomers, and in engineering reactive, and responsive polyether-based materials, e.g., ion-conducting polymers, pH-responsive hydrogel materials, and degradable biomedical materials.

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IGSB/IME Special Seminar: Aryeh Warmflash - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IGSB/IME Special Seminar: Aryeh Warmflash

Date

January 27, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

KCBD 1103

Details

Speaker: Aryeh Warmflash, PhD
The Rockefeller University
Center for Studies in Physics and Biology
New York, NY

Title: “Embryonic patterning in time and space”

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IME Seminar 2/6 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Matthew Tirrell

Date

February 6, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Prof. Matthew Tirrell

Title: "New Materials from Polyelectrolyte Self-Assembly"

Highly charged polymer chains in monovalent salt media exhibit a fairly simple range of behaviors, swelling in low salt, shrinking in high salt, based on the screening of repulsive electrostatic interactions among the segments. In the presence of multivalent constituents, attractive forces arise between polyelectrolyte chains. These attractions produce strong collapse of polyelectrolyte chains, adhesion between polyelectrolyte bearing surfaces, precipitation, and in the case of mixtures of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, formation of fluid complex coacervate phases. Such polyelectrolyte complexes have very low interfacial tension with water, and so engulf particles, invade porous media and spread on surfaces. Inorganic syntheses can produce nanoparticles in situ. Multicomponent polymers with polyelectrolyte blocks can self-assembly in novel ways producing new ordered, hydrogel materials that can be the basis for new materials from biomedicine to tough composites.

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IGSB/IME Special Seminar: Marcus Noyes - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IGSB/IME Special Seminar: Marcus Noyes

Date

February 10, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

BSLC 001

Details

Speaker: Marcus Noyes
Lewis-Sigler Fellow
Princeton University

Title: "Bridging Systems and Synthetic Biology with Comprehensive Screens of Protein Function"

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Society of Physics Students Seminar: David Awschalom - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Society of Physics Students Seminar: David Awschalom

Date

February 10, 2014
5:45 PM - 7:00 PM

Location

KPTC 106

Details

The University of Chicago Society of Physics Students presents

Quantum spintronics: sandbox or technology?

Speaker: Professor David Awschalom

The past decade has seen remarkable progress in isolating and controlling quantum coherence using charges and spins in semiconductors. Quantum control has been established at room temperature, and electron spin coherence times now exceed several seconds, a nine–order-of-magnitude increase in coherence compared with the first semiconductor qubits. These coherence times rival those traditionally found only in atomic systems, ushering in a new era of ultracoherent spintronics. We review recent advances in quantum measurements, coherent control, and the generation of entangled states and describe some of the challenges that remain for processing quantum information with spins in semiconductors.

Pizza will be served. The dinner starts at 5:45pm and the talk starts at 6:00pm. Please RSVP to the Facebook event, listed under related links.

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IGSB/IME Special Seminar: Prashant Mali - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IGSB/IME Special Seminar: Prashant Mali

Date

February 17, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

KCBD 1103

Details

Speaker: Prashant Mali
Postdoctoral Researcher
Department of Genetics
Harvard Medical School

Title: "Cas9 as a versatile tool for engineering biology"

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IME Special Seminar: Brian Zhou - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Brian Zhou

Date

February 18, 2014
11:00 AM - 11:59 PM

Location

GCIS E123

Details

Speaker: Brian Zhou
Princeton University

Title: "Visualizing nodal heavy fermion superconductivity in CeCoIn5"

In solids containing elements with f-orbitals, the interaction between f-electron spins and those of itinerant electrons leads to the development of low-energy fermionic excitations with heavy effective mass and the subsequent appearance of unconventional superconducting ground states. Previously, we used the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), a tool for probing the spatially resolved electronic density of states, to visualize the scattering of quasiparticles and detect their mass enhancement in the prototypical Ce-115 heavy fermion family. Here, through development of a new instrument capable of operating at milli-Kelvin temperature and high magnetic field, we demonstrate the onset of a spectroscopic pseudogap prior to superconductivity and particle-hole asymmetric quasiparticle interference in the superconducting state of CeCoIn5. Through visualizing the spatial symmetry of quasiparticle states bound to atomic defects, we directly pinpoint the d-wave structure of Cooper pairing in CeCoIn5 to parallel that of the high-temperature cuprate superconductors.

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IME Special Seminar: Michael Jewett - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Michael Jewett

Date

February 19, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

In collaboration with GeneHackers, an undergraduate student organization, IME will be bringing special speakers to raise awareness of synthetic biology,

Speaker: Michael Jewett
Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Northwestern University

Title: "Establishing cell-free biology for the production of therapeutics, materials, and chemicals"

Imagine a world in which we could adapt biology to manufacture any therapeutic, material, or chemical from renewable resources, both quickly and on demand. Industrial biotechnology is one of the most attractive approaches for addressing this need, particularly when large-scale chemical synthesis is untenable. Unfortunately, the fraction of biobased products amenable to economical production is limited because engineering whole-cell microorganisms with synthetic pathways remains costly and slow. We hypothesize that a key problem to these efforts lies with the inherent limitations imposed by cells. Cells exist to produce more cells, not to produce items of commerce, which often are an unnecessary or even toxic burden on the primary cellular objectives of growth and adaptation. This leads to a variety of challenges afflicting the current state-of-the-art, including: low yields and productivities, build-up of toxic intermediates or products, and byproduct losses via competing pathways.To overcome these limitations, we are expanding the scope of the traditional engineering model in biotechnology by using cell-free systems to harness ensembles of catalytic proteins prepared from crude lysates, or extracts, of cells for the production of target products. Rather than attempt to balance the tug-of-war between the cell’s objectives and the engineer’s objectives, we are developing new paradigms for designing, building, and testing cell-free systems that harness and modify biological systems involved in protein synthesis and metabolism. In this presentation, I will discuss our efforts to develop cost-effective, high-throughput cell-free protein synthesis platforms, expand the chemistry of life using non canonical amino acids, construct and evolve synthetic ribosomes, and produce sustainable chemicals with ultrahigh productivities. Our work is enabling a deeper understanding of why nature’s designs work the way they do and opening new frontiers for biomanufacturing.

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IME Seminar 2/20 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Fellow Seminar: Seth B. Darling

Date

February 20, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Seth B. Darling

Seth B. Darling is a Scientist at Argonne National Laboratory and a Fellow at the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago. After receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in Physical Chemistry, he joined Argonne National Laboratory as the Glenn Seaborg Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow in the Materials Science Division where he studied directed self-assembly of polymers and polymer/nanoparticle hybrid systems. Following his postdoc, Dr. Darling joined the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne as a staff scientist. His group’s research centers around polymer molecular engineering with a particular emphasis on organic solar cells. He also serves as the solar energy strategy leader for Argonne, through which he interfaces with a spectrum of internal scientists, engineers, and managers as well as external domestic and international stakeholders in industry, government, museums and foundations, national laboratories, market analysis firms, academia, and the media.

Title: "Polymer molecular engineering for solar energy, lithography, and beyond"

This seminar will provide an overview of two major research thrusts in my group: organic solar cells and sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS).

Organic solar cells have attracted increasing attention as potential low-cost alternatives to traditional inorganic photovoltaic (PV) technologies. Using a suite of advanced characterization techniques, it is possible to decipher the morphology of OPV active layers across length scales from the molecular to the mesoscopic. Correlating these structural features with optoelectronic function leads to morphology-performance relationship insights, which in turn can be utilized as the foundation for a rational design of improved performance in OPV devices. Initial results from this methodology are encouraging, suggesting a viable alternative to the traditional Edisonian approach to device performance improvement.

SIS is a novel synthetic technique developed at Argonne that enables precise growth of a wide variety of inorganic materials within polymer films with applications spanning lithography, photocatalysis, water treatment, and more.  Studies on both homopolymer and block copolymer systems will be discussed, providing some background on the potential of SIS to revolutionize patterning technologies.

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Admitted Students Visiting Weekend - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Admitted Students Visiting Weekend

Date

February 21, 2014
8:00 AM - 10:00 PM

Location

University of Chicago

Details

Students that were admitted to the IME PhD program for Fall 2015 are invited to campus to tour facilities, meet with professors, and speak with current students and researchers. If you have any questions about the admitted student visit weekend, please contact Diana Morgan.

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IGSB/IME Special Seminar: Jun Huang - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IGSB/IME Special Seminar: Jun Huang

Date

February 24, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

KCBD 1103

Details

Speaker: Jun Huang
Postdoctoral Researcher
Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Stanford University

Title: "A Single Peptide-MHC Triggers Digital Cytokine Secretion in CD4+ T Cells"

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The Informed City: Data-Driven Approaches to a More Just, Equitable, and Sustainable City - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: The Informed City: Data-Driven Approaches to a More Just, Equitable, and Sustainable City

Date

March 4, 2014
1:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Location

Gleacher Center Room 400

Details

As a precursor to World Urban Forum 7 in Medellín, Colombia, in April 2014, please join us for a discussion of the global city of tomorrow.

Leading public, private, academic, and non-profit sector experts will share their insights on data-driven approaches to urban planning, design, health, education, water infrastructure, and crime prevention.
REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT
* * *

AGENDA
1:00 p.m.  Welcome & Opening Remarks
Ian H. Solomon, Vice President, Office of Global Engagement, University of Chicago
Alaina Harkness, Program Officer, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation


1:30 p.m.  Computation, Data, and Mobile Devices to Understand, Design, Sustain, and Enhance the City
Charlie Catlett, Director, Urban Center for Computation and Data, Senior Computer Scientist, Mathematics and Computer Science Division, University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory (Moderator)
Brenna Berman, Commissioner and CIO, Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT), City of Chicago
Kate Cagney, Associate Professor, Sociology and Health Studies, Director, Population Research Center, NORC & University of Chicago
Melissa Gilliam, Co-Founder, Game Changer Chicago Design Lab, Professor of Obstetrics/Gynecology and Pediatrics Chief, University of Chicago  
Stacy Lindau, Associate Professor of Obstetrics/Gynecology and Medicine-Geriatrics, Director, South Side Health and Vitality Studies (SSHVS), University of Chicago
John Tolva, former Chief Technology Officer, City of Chicago, President, PositivEnergy Practice

2:45 p.m.  Sustainable Water in the 21st Century City
Sharon Feng, Executive Director, Institute for Molecular Engineering
Seth Snyder, Section Leader, Process Technology Research in the Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory (Moderator)
Mary Ann Dickinson, President and CEO, Alliance for Water Efficiency
Debra Shore, Commissioner, Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago
David St. Pierre, Executive Director, Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago
Karen Weigert, Chief Sustainability Officer, City of Chicago

      
3:45 p.m.  Harnessing Data for Violence Prevention, Safety and Opportunity: Who are you going to trust, the data or your lying eyes?
Maurice Classen, Program Officer, Community & Economic Development, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation (Moderator)
Jonathan Guryan, Associate Professor of Human Development and Social Policy in the Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern University; Co-Director, University of Chicago Urban Education Lab
Jens Ludwig, McCormick Foundation Professor of Social Service Administration, Law, and Public Policy; Director, University of Chicago Crime Lab; Co-Director, University of Chicago Urban Education Lab
Mark Saint, Site Director, Match Education


4:45 p.m.  Concluding Remarks
Richard Longworth, Senior Fellow, The Chicago Council on Global Affairs
Derek R.B. Douglas, Vice President, Office of Civic Engagement, University of Chicago

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Object-based, art-science workshop: Classical, Modern, and Postmodern Across the Disciplines - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Object-based, art-science workshop: Classical, Modern, and Postmodern Across the Disciplines

Date

March 7, 2014
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Location

Smart Museum Study Room

Details

Object-based, art-science workshop
Classical, Modern, and Postmodern Across the Disciplines

Please join the Smart Museum of Art for an object-based workshop on classical, modern, and postmodern forms and philosophies across the disciplines.

With presentations by

Anthony Cheung
Assistant Professor of Music

Nancy Kawalek
Distinguished Fellow in the Arts, Science, & Technology and Professor, Institute for Molecular Engineering

Glenn W. Most
Professor of Social Thought and of Classics

Sidney Nagel
Stein-Freiler Distinguished Service Professor in Physics

Moderated by
Mark Hereld
Senior Fellow, Computation Institute.

RSVP to aleonard@uchicago.edu.

Space is limited. Students and faculty from all disciplines are welcome.

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IGSB/IME Special Seminar: Sabrina Leigh Spencer - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IGSB/IME Special Seminar: Sabrina Leigh Spencer

Date

March 11, 2014
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Location

KCBD 1103

Details

Ben May Department for Cancer Research
Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology
Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology
and Institute for Molecular Engineering present a special seminar:

Speaker: Sabrina Leigh Spencer
​Department of Chemical and Systems Biology
Stanford University Medical Center

Title: "Single Cell Dynamics of the Proliferation-Quiescence Decision"

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UChicago Weekend - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: UChicago Weekend

Date

March 13 - March 15, 2014
All Day Event

Location

University of Chicago Campus

Details

A campus-wide event for admitted doctoral students from underrepresented backgrounds.

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IME Special Seminar 3/20 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Byeongdu Lee

Date

March 20, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Byeongdu Lee
Physicist
Chemical and Materials Science
X-Ray Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory

Title: "X-ray scattering studies on particle assemblies through various interactions."

Interactions between nanoparticles or biological particles are of great interest not only because knowing it is crucial to understand thermodynamic behavior of the ensemble of the particles but also because their directed assemblies with controlled interparticle interactions may result in unique physical or chemical properties. X-ray scattering studies on various nanoparticle assemblies will be presented with a focus on the interparticle interactions such as DNA hybridization, like-charge attraction and depletion interaction.

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IGSB/IME Special Seminar: Arren Bar-Even - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IGSB/IME Special Seminar: Arren Bar-Even

Date

March 20, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

KCBD 1103

Details

Speaker: Arren Bar-Even
Postdoctoral Researcher
Weizmann Institute of Science

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IME Special Seminar: Samanvaya Srivastava - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Samanvaya Srivastava

Date

March 26, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

KCBD 1103

Details

Speaker: Samanvaya Srivastava
Graduate Student
School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Cornell University

Title: "Tethered Nanoparticle/Polymer Composites: Structure, Dynamics and Rheology"

Polymer nanocomposites are ubiquitous in the modern world and find application in many diverse areas. However, limited control of the nanoparticle dispersion in the polymeric host offered by the current technologies limits our ability to fine tune the nanocomposite bulk properties and extend their utility.
In this talk, we will explore the avenues of employing nanoparticle tethered with polymers chains to overcome the strong van der Waals attraction forces among the nanoparticles and limit their aggregation tendencies. Characterization of model nanocomposites comprising of silica nanoparticles grafted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains and dispersed in PEG matrix through a variety of experimental techniques, including small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), X-ray correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), electron microscopy and mechanical rheology, will be discussed. SAXS results were found to be instrumental in determination of the phase behavior of these nanocomposites, and a comparison with contemporary studies is presented. The synthesis platform was found to provide a fine control over the bulk properties of well-dispersed nanocomposites with an ability to facilely vary their flow properties over a large range through small increments in particle loadings. Further, SAXS results revealed an anomalous structural pattern wherein particle correlation was found to decrease with increasing loading. This structural anomaly was followed a dynamic anomaly as indicated by XPCS measurements, the nanoparticle motion was found to get faster with increasing loading. We conclude by elucidating the possible origins of this anomalous behavior and its connections to the bulk flow properties in these materials.

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Marker Lectures in the Physical Sciences - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Marker Lectures in the Physical Sciences

Date

March 26, 8:00 PM - March 28, 9:00 PM, 2014

Location

Penn State University Park Campus

Details

David Awschalom, Liew Family Professor of Molecular Engineering, will present the Russell Marker Lectures in the Physical Sciences on 26, 27, and 28 March 2014 on the Penn State University Park campus. The free public lectures are sponsored by the Penn State Eberly College of Science. The series includes a lecture intended for a general audience, titled "Engaging Diamonds in the Quantum Age," at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, 26 March, in 100 Life Sciences Building, with light refreshments following the talk.

In the lecture, Awschalom will discuss the remarkable development of semiconductor spintronics, a burgeoning area of research that aims to enable fundamentally new information technologies based on a quantum property of the electron known as "spin." Research at the frontiers of this field includes efforts to orient and manipulate individual electron spins in nanometer-scale structures. These developments have sweeping technological implications ranging from secure data encryption to radical improvements in computation speed and complexity. The talk will describe advances toward these goals, including the surprising recent discovery that diamond -- a material that has been available for generations -- has the ability to control the atomic-scale spins that will be important for emerging information technologies in communication and computation.

Awschalom also will present two additional, more-specialized lectures, titled "Beyond Electronics: Abandoning Perfection for Quantum Technologies," at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, 27 March, in 117 Osmond Laboratory; and "Ultrafast Quantum Control of Single Electron Orbital and Spin Dynamics in Diamond," at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, 28 February, in 320 Whitmore Laboratory.

The Marker Lectures were established in 1984 through a gift from Russell Earl Marker, professor emeritus of chemistry at Penn State, whose pioneering synthetic methods revolutionized the steroid-hormone industry and opened the door to the current era of hormone therapies, including the birth-control pill. The Marker endowment allows the Penn State Eberly College of Science to present annual Marker Lectures in astronomy and astrophysics, the chemical sciences, evolutionary biology, genetic engineering, the mathematical sciences, and physics. For more information about the 2014 Russell Marker Lectures in the Physical Sciences, contact Julianne Mortimore at jrm62@psu.edu.

 

Event description from Penn State Eberly College of Science

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IME Special Seminar: Gerard Fuller - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Gerard Fuller

Date

April 2, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

BSLC 205

Details

Speaker: Gerald G. Fuller
Chemical Engineering
Stanford University

Title: "The Dynamics of Two Biological Interfaces"

Biological systems are normally high-interface systems and these surfaces are laden with biological molecules and cells that render them mechanically complex. The resulting nonlinearities with response to surface stresses and strain are often essential to their proper function and these are explored using recently developed methods that reveal an intricate interplay between applied stress and dynamic response. Two applications are discussed.

1. Vascular endothelial cells are nature's "rheologists" and line the interior walls of our blood vessels and are sensitive to surface shear stresses. These stresses are known to affect the shape and orientation of endothelial cells. It is evident that the spatial homogeneity of flow can affect vascular health and it is well-documented that lesions form in regions of high curvature, bifurcations, and asperities in blood vessels. Experiments are described where stagnation point flows are used to create regions of well controlled flow stagnation and spatial variation of wall shear stresses. Live-cell imaging is used to monitor the fate of cells attached to surfaces experiencing flow impingement and it is revealed that endothelial cells migrate and orient in such flows to create remarkable patterns of orientation and cell densification. This response, termed "rheotaxis", is used to explore mechano-transduction pathways within these cells.

2. The tear film of the eye is a composite structure of an aqueous solution of protein and biomacromolecules. This thin layer is further covered by a film comprised of meibomian lipids excreted during each blink. The purpose of the meibum has been largely unexplained although one prevailing suggestion is that it suppresses evaporation. Recent measurements in our laboratory demonstrate that this layer is strongly viscoelastic and this property has dramatic effects on the dynamics of the moving contact line and stability against dewetting.

 

Gerald Fuller is the Fletcher Jones Professor of Chemical Engineering at Stanford University where he has carried out research and taught since graduating from Caltech in 1980. Professor Fuller's research has centered on three areas of rheology: optical rheometry, extensional rheology, and interfacial rheology. This experimental effort has been aimed at a wide range of soft materials that includes polymer solutions and melts, liquid crystals, suspensions, surfactants, and living systems. Recent applications are linked to biological materials. Professor Fuller received the Bingham Award from The Society of Rheology, is a Fellow of the APS, and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

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IME Seminar 4/3 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: David Christle and Takejiro Inoue

Date

April 3, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: David Christle, Awschalom Group

Title: "Wide Bandgap Defects for Sensing and Quantum Information"

While most individually addressable quantum systems operate near absolute zero, the spin of the diamond NV center can be controlled at room temperature while maintaining its quantum coherence. We show that its spin resonance temperature dependence makes it promising for nanoscale thermosensing over a broad temperature range. These spin-thermometers may find application in cellular thermometry and scanning thermal microscopy.


Speaker: Takejiro Inoue, Nealey Group

Title: "Replication of chemical patterns over large area by 'Molecular Transfer Printing'"

“Molecular Transfer Printing” is a promising method to replicate chemical patterns with feature dimensions of the order of 10nm utilizing a master template defined by the microphase-separated domains of a block copolymer thin film. Here show a new approach that utilizes a chemically deposited SiNx layer and a liquid-conformal layer to enable replication of chemical patterns over large, continuous areas.

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IME Special Seminar: Vladimir Dyakonov - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Vladimir Dyakonov

Date

April 16, 2014
2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Location

KCBD 1103

Details

Speaker: Vladimir Dyakonov
Chair of Experimental Physics VI
Dean of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy
Julius-Maximilian University of Würzburg, Germany

Title: "Intrinsic Defects in SiC for Spin-based Quantum Applications"

Atomic-scale defects in silicon carbide usually limit the performance of this material in high-power electronics and radio-frequency communication. Here, we discuss a family of silicon vacancy-related defects in SiC exhibiting attractive spin properties. In particular, the defect spins can be initialized and readout even at room temperature by means of optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR), suggesting appealing quantum applications. [1] Using ODMR technique we detect two-quantum spin resonances, proving S = 3/2 ground state of the silicon vacancy-related defects. The optically-induced population inversion of these high-spin ground states leads to stimulated microwave emission, which we directly observed in our silicon carbide crystals. [2] The analysis based on the experimentally obtained parameters shows that this property can be used to implement solid-state masers. Further, we fabricated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on intrinsic defects in SiC using a standard manufacturing technology in combination with high-energy electron irradiation. The room temperature electroluminescence of our LEDs reveals two strong emission bands in the visible and near infrared spectral ranges, associated with two different intrinsic defects. Comparing the electroluminescence and photoluminescence properties of 6H-SiC LEDs we could assign the electroluminescence at 850-1050 nm to silicon-vacancy related (VSi) defects. [3]  Finally, we show that these atomic-scale defects can be also attractive for local sensing of magnetic fields, as well as, temperature. [4]

[1] D. Riedel et al.: Resonant addressing and manipulation of silicon vacancy qubits in silicon carbide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 226402 (2012);
[2] H. Kraus et al.: Room temperature quantum microwave emitters based on atomic-scale defects in silicon carbide, Nat. Phys. 10, 157 (2014).
[3] F. Fuchs et al.: Silicon carbide light-emitting diode as a prospective room temperature source for single photons, Sci. Rep. 3, 1637 (2013).
[4] H. Kraus et al.: Magnetic field and temperature sensing with atomic-scale spin defects in silicon carbide, e-print arXiv:1403.7741.

 

Vladimir Dyakonov is holding the Chair of Experimental Physics on the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of Julius-Maximilian University of Würzburg, Germany and the Scientific Director of the Bavarian Centre of Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern) since 2004. He studied physics at the University of St. Petersburg and received his doctorate at the A. F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute. Since 1990, he has been a visiting researcher at the universities of Bayreuth, Antwerp, Linz and Oldenburg. He finished his habilitation in experimental physics in 2001 at the University of Oldenburg, Germany. In 2010 he has been the Spokesman of German Renewable Energy Research Association (FVEE). His main research interests comprise investigations of functional materials for energy efficiency and spin physics of carbon-based and inorganic semiconductors.

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IME Seminar 4/17 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Margaret Gardel

Date

April 17, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Margaret Gardel
IME Fellow

Title: "Building Contractile Matter"

The cytoskeleton of living cells is a quintessential example of active matter, in which internal molecular processes transduce chemical energy into local stresses that drive structural rearrangements and dominate its material response.  The physical behaviors of such “living matter” engender cells with the ability to move, divide and build multi-cellular tissue.  Across diverse physiological processes, an important class of cytoskeletal materials includes those that generate contractile forces.  By reconstituting contractile matter from purified protein constituents, our lab aims to elucidate the physical principles of these active materials so that we can further engineer and modify their behaviors.

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IME Special Seminar: Miron Landau - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Miron Landau

Date

April 17, 2014
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Miron Landau
Professor
Chemical Engineering
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Title: Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of organic contaminants with TiO2 and Au/TiO2 catalysts in dark

The heterogeneous catalytic Fenton wet peroxide oxidation of phenol was compared with Fe/SiO2, Au/Hydroxyappatite and Au/TiO2 catalysts. The only one leach proof system at conditions required for efficient TOC removal is Au deposited on titania. It was established that nanostructured TiO2 with crystal size in range of 4.5-30 nm display stable operation in phenol CWPO in dark [PhOH = 200 ppmw] yielding 4 h-1. The TOC conversion obtained at that conditions is proportional to titania surface area varied in range of 30-310 m2/g Deposition of ~ 3 wt.% of Au nanoparticles increases the catalytic activity of TiO2 in CWPO of phenol defined as pseudo-first-order rate constant of substrate mineralization by a factor of 2.0-2.8 depending on Au crystal size. Small 3-4 nm Au nanoparticles aggregate at reaction conditions with complete deactivation of Au component. Larger 7-8 nm Au nanoparticles are stable against aggregation and deactivation. Interaction with hydrogen peroxide is the reason for growth of Au nanoparticles increasing their mobility. No leaching of Ti and Au was detected in runs with duration up to 300h. The CWPO with both Au and TiO2 catalysts proceeds according to radical mechanism mostly in the part of catalysts layer where H2O2 is completely decomposed. At proper operation conditions TiO2 and Au/TiO2 catalysts allow reaching > 95% mineralization of phenol and stable operation. The Au/TiO2 is efficient in decontamination of industrial wastewater containing halogenated organics decreasing the TOC content and increasing the biodegradability of remained organics.

 

Miron Landau is a Professor of Chemical Engineering in the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. He received his MSc. and Ph.D (1977) degrees in Chemistry from the Moscow State University. For 20 years he led a research group in the Al-Russian Research Institute of Oil Refining (VNIINP) in Moscow (Russia). There his research was focused on development of advanced catalytic materials for production of transportation fuels by hydrotreating / hydrocracking processes. Many of catalysts developed by his group were commercialized. At 1990 Prof. Landau joined Ben-Gurion University where conducted extensive research programs aiming developments of catalytic and adsorptive materials for production of transportation fuels, chemicals and environmental protection. The industrial projects were founded by Israeli Oil refineries, Makhteshim-Agan, Israeli Electricity Company, Exxon-Mobil Inc., UOP Inc. and others. His fundamental research is focused on the preparation - self-assembling of nanoparticles of catalytic phases with different complementary chemical functionality, their stabilization in mesostructured porous matrices and carbon nanotubes and control of their surface chemistry.

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UCISTEM IME Information Session - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: UCISTEM: IME Information Session

Date

April 22, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Location

Ida Noyes East Lounge

Details


University of Chicago Careers In Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics: Information session on IME's new minor in molecular engineering

Sharon Feng, executive director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering, will talk about the new undergraduate minor to be offered starting in the autumn 2014 quarter, and the courses available (such as Introduction to Emerging Technologies, Nanomaterials, Mathematical Foundations, Product Design, and Research Practice).

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Industrial Associates Meeting - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Industrial Associates Meeting

Date

April 29, 2014
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Location

GCIS 301/303 and Atrium

Details

The Department of Chemistry's Industrial Associates Meeting features University of Chicago graduate students and postdocs in chemistry, chemical biology, biophysics, molecular engineering and related disciplines to potential employers in industrial and government settings.  Employers have the opportunity to promote their organization and to screen candidates in a variety of one-on-one interactions.

To learn more about the meeting and learn how to register, visit the main page for the event.

Registration closes on April 4th

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IME Special Seminar: Michael E. Flatte - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Michael E. Flatté

Date

April 30, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Michael E. Flatté
F. Wendell Miller Professor of Physics
Dept. Physics and Astronomy
Dept. Electrical and Computer Engineering
Director, Optical Science and Technology Center

Title: "Spin correlations in room-temperature electronic transport, and implications for spin-coherent technologies"

Much of modern high-volume information storage technology relies on room-temperature spin transport, especially through the magnetoresistance of so-called "spin valves'', which can have parallel or antiparallel magnetic domains. Electrons experience different resistance moving through such domains, depending on whether their spins are parallel or antiparallel to the magnetization of the material they traverse.  New types of room-temperature devices are possible, however, that rely on spin correlations in transport. These spin-spin interactions render the resistance and electroluminescence of nonmagnetic organic materials very sensitive to small external fields, and to fringing fields from nearby magnetic domains.  Spin-spin interactions in magnetic insulators also can be controlled with electric fields, yielding room-temperature voltage-controlled phase-shifters for coherent spin wave transport. In each case the spins interact through the local electronic structure of the host material, and respond to local spin-orbit fields, nuclear fields, bonding symmetry, and other effects of the environment.

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IME Seminar 5/1 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Paul Nealey

Date

May 1, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Prof. Paul Nealey

Title: "Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers: a platform for nanomanufacturing"

DSA of block copolymer films on lithographically defined chemically nanopatterned surfaces is an emerging technology that is well-positioned for commercialization in nanolithography and naomanufacturing. Critical research questions that remain to be fully addressed in the development of materials and processes for directed self-assembly (DSA) relate to sub 10 nm resolution, fundamental understanding of the origin of defects, and quantitative determination of the three-dimensional structure in the assembled films. Here we will present the thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of the DSA processes we developed that are being implemented in manufacturing relevant settings at IMEC and at HGST, a Western Digital Company. The discussion will focus on the potential for those processes to meet the constraints for semiconducting manufacturing and fabrication of nanoimprint templates for bit patterned media.

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IME Seminar 5/15 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Juan de Pablo

Date

May 15, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Juan de Pablo
Liew Family Professor in Molecular Engineering

Title: "A hierarchical view of DNA. It's not just the size; shape matters."

There is considerable interest in controlling the presentation of long DNA at surfaces for genomics. Increasingly, applications in nanotechnology also require control of DNA presentation and hybridization at interfaces. This talk will provide an overview of recent advances in our ability to model and manipulate DNA experimentally through the application of external fields, and of the role of sequence and mechanical properties in modulating its complexation with proteins and nanoparticles.

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IME Colloquium: Paula Apsell - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Colloquium: Paula Apsell

Date

May 21, 2014
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Paula Apsell
Senior Executive Producer, NOVA and NOVA scienceNOW, and Director, WGBH Science Unit
WGBH Boston | Boston, Massachusetts

Title: "The Art of Science Television"

Using clips from the internationally acclaimed and award winning NOVA science series, Senior Executive Producer Paula Apsell will discuss the art of science television.  How are topics chosen? How does one make difficult material not only accessible but compelling?   How does one educate, entertain, and stimulate creative and critical thinking, all at the same time?   And what particular challenges face science journalists and educators today, when scientific and cultural literacy are more at risk than ever in a computer-game-oriented society with literally hundreds of media choices  available with the flick of the remote control?


Paula S. Apsell got her start in broadcasting at WGBH Boston, where she was hired fresh out of Brandeis University to type the public broadcaster’s daily television program logs—a job that Apsell notes is now, mercifully, automated. Within a year, she found her way to WGBH Radio, where she developed the award-winning children’s drama series, The Spider’s Web, and later became a radio news producer. In 1975, she joined WGBH’s NOVA, a science documentary series that has set the standard for science programming on television, producing documentaries on subjects as varied as artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, and aviation safety. Her NOVA Death of a Disease was the first long form documentary on the worldwide eradication of smallpox.

After leaving NOVA in 1981, Apsell went to WCVB, the ABC affiliate in Boston, known for quality content, as senior producer for medical programming working with Dr. Timothy Johnson. During that time, she produced Someone I Once Knew, an award-winning documentary that essentially broke the story on Alzheimer’s disease, showing that dementia is a pathology, not an inevitable product of old age. Apsell then spent a year at MIT as a Knight Science Journalism Fellow. In 1985, she was asked to take over the reins at NOVA where she is now Senior Executive Producer and Director of the WGBH Science Unit. As well as overseeing the production of NOVA documentaries and miniseries for television, she has directed the series’ diversification into other media—most notably online, where NOVA is the most visited site on PBS.org. NOVA can also be found in classrooms nationwide, where it is the most widely used video resource among high school science teachers.

In January 2005, Apsell introduced a NOVA spinoff in NOVA scienceNOW, a critically acclaimed science newsmagazine hosted formerly by Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson and now by New York Times technology columnist David Pogue. Other recent signature NOVA and Science Unit productions include The Elegant Universe, Origins, Einstein’s Big Idea, Judgment Day: Intelligent Design on Trial, Making Stuff, and the large format feature Shackleton’s Antarctic Adventure.

Today, NOVA is the most popular science series on American television and online. Under Apsell’s leadership, NOVA has won every major broadcasting award, some many times over, including the Emmy; the Peabody; the AAAS Science Journalism award; the Gold Baton duPont-Columbia; and an Academy Award® nomination for Special Effects. In 1998, the National Science Board of the National Science Foundation awarded NOVA its first-ever Public Service Award.

Apsell has been recognized with numerous individual awards for her work, including the Bradford Washburn Award from the Museum of Science, Boston; the Carl Sagan Award given by the Council of Scientific Society Presidents; the American Institute of Physics Andrew Gemant Award; the Planetary Society’s Cosmos Award; the International Documentary Association’s Pioneer Award; the National Space Club of Huntsville Media Award; and the New York Hall of Science Distinguished Service Award for Public Understanding of Science. She has served on the board of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History; the Brandeis University Sciences Advisory Committee; and the International Documentary Association. Apsell holds honorary doctorates from Southern Methodist University and Dickinson College.

She lives in Newton, MA with her husband Sheldon, an inventor. The Apsell’s have two grown daughters, one a physician, the other a television producer.

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IME Special Seminar: Kristin Persson - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Kristin Persson

Date

May 23, 2014
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Location

KCBD 1100

Details

Speaker: Kristin Persson, PhD
Staff Scientist
Electrochemical Technologies Group
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Title: "Combining Information Technology with First-Principles Modeling towards Materials Design for Energy Application"

In the spirit of Materials Genome Initiative, the BES-funded Materials Project aims to leverage the information age for materials design. The goal of the Materials Project is to accelerate materials discovery and education through advanced scientific computing and innovative design methods, scale those computations to inorganic compounds and beyond, and disseminate that information and design tools to the larger materials community.

Today – 2 years after launch, the Materials Project is driving materials innovation in broad chemical and structure spaces, for applications as varied as energy storage, energy production, thermoelectricity, design of metal ductility, transparent conductors, predicting materials synthesis conditions etc. This talk will highlight a few of the many projects that have been successfully concluded or are being pursued using the capabilities and materials understanding that has emerged from our approach of data informed materials design. Such projects are i) stability of inorganic materials in aqueous electrolytes for battery, fuel cell and catalysis applications, and design principles for ii) novel multivalent intercalation cathode discovery and iii) electrolytes.

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IME Seminar 5/29 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Giulia Galli

Date

May 29, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

KCBD 1103

Details

Speaker: Prof. Giulia Galli

Title: "Predicting complex materials properties with first principles calculations"

We will focus on predictions of the chemical and physical properties of complex materials for energy applications, including solar, photo-electrochemical and thermoelectric energy conversion. We will discuss two intertwined questions: what is the impact of microscopic theories and first principles simulations on energy related problems? How do we take up the challenge of building much needed tighter connections between computational and laboratory experiments?

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IME Special Seminar: Moshe Herzberg - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Moshe Herzberg

Date

June 5, 2014
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Moshe Herzberg
​The Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research
Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research
Ben-Gurion University

Title: "Relations between biofilm viscoelasticity and biofouling extent of Reverse Osmosis membranes: Case study of cellulose in the EPS matrix"

Biological fouling, mainly bacterial originated, can be an extent acute problem in the operation of seawater desalination facilities even when the water inlet contains low levels of nutrients. Microbial has destructive influences on the desalination process, including decrease in the permeate water flux, its quality and an increase in frequency of the membrane cleaning. This project aims to investigate in a controlled manner, if changes in the extracellular polymeric matrix (EPS) compartments will influence the biofilm-membrane relationship that is in charge for changes in permeate flux and salt rejection. A model component that was chosen to be investigated in the EPS matrix of the marine bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, is cellulose. We examine the effects of cellulose, contained in the EPS, on its coherence and viscoelastic properties. Also, we show how the extent of cellulose in the EPS influences the RO membranes performance as a consequent reduction in permeate flux during the desalination process in a laboratory scale. We claim that there is a relation between the mechanical strength and elasticity that cellulose provides to the extracellular matrix and the decrease in membrane performance.

Three different strains of the marine bacterium V. fischeri were used: a wild type, and two isogenic strains, up- and down-regulating cellulose production and secretion. For that purpose, EPS was extracted from biofilm strains that were grown on polyamide surface, mimicking RO membrane. The extracted EPS was exploited to test its viscoelastic properties as well as to investigate the fouling extent of the three types of EPS on the RO membrane during the desalination process.  EPS adherence and viscoelastic properties were evaluated in a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technology. Complementing the QCM-D analysis, a positive correlation was found between cellulose expression and Young’s modulus of the biofilms using atomic force microscope (AFM). Observations of EPS species adherence to polyamide surfaces, mimicking RO membranes, denied the influence of cellulose on EPS deposition, however, QCM-D and AFM analyses have shown that with increase of cellulose content, a rising trend of the matrix rigidity was observed. These bacterial strains, altered in cellulose expression also showed interesting changes in biofouling of RO membranes during desalination process. Higher amount of cellulose has shown to reduce permeate flux attributed to increase in the biofilm matrix rigidity, which consequently, acquire the biofouling layer with higher resistance to shear stress providing thicker biofilm with higher hydraulic resistance. To our knowledge, this is the first time, elastic properties of biofouling layers are shown to directly affect membrane performance.

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UnCommon Core | “Water, Water, Everywhere, Nor Any Drop to Drink”: The UChicago Water Research Initi - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: UnCommon Core Lecture

Date

June 5, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

Social Sciences Research Building 122

Details

Speaker: Steven J. Sibener
Carl William Eisendrath Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Chemistry and the James Franck Institute; Director, Institute for Molecular Engineering Water Research Initiative

Title: "Water, Water, Everywhere, Nor Any Drop to Drink": The UChicago Water Research Initiative

The availability of fresh water for human consumption is becoming increasingly constrained around the world. Such shortages will increase in the future due to rising demand and the depletion of extant water resources, affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. The UChicago Water Research Initiative, in partnership with Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, seeks to address some of the most critical technological issues in water resource development. This presentation will give a snapshot of water utilization, stresses, and opportunities for technological solutions.

 

The Social Sciences Research Building is located at 1126 E. 59th St.

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UnCommon Core | Engineering Materials for Sustainable Energy Sources - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: UnCommon Core Lecture

Date

June 6, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

Social Sciences Research Building 122

Details

Speaker: Giulia Galli

Title: "Engineering Materials for Sustainable Energy Sources"

Climate change and the related need for sustainable energy sources to replace fossil fuels are pressing societal problems. The development of advanced materials is widely recognized as one of the key elements for new technologies that are required to achieve a sustainable environment and provide clean and adequate energy for our planet. Galli will discuss how the combination of advanced theory and computation with state-of-the-art experiments may lead to successful bottom-up design of materials for energy applications.

 

The Social Sciences Research Building is located at 1126 E. 59th St.

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IME Seminar 6/12 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Nicola Ferrier

Date

June 12, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Nicola Ferrier
IME Fellow
Principal Automation Engineer
Mathematics and Computer Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory
Senior Fellow
Computation Institute
University of Chicago

Title: "Image based methods for 3D structure: characterizing nanoscale materials"

Recovering 3D structure from images has been the focus of computer vision research for decades.  This talk will look at the challenges involved in adapting  image based methods for characterizing structure of materials.

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IME Special Seminar: Alexander Hexemer - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Alexander Hexemer

Date

June 18, 2014
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Alexander Hexemer
Staff Scientist
Experimental Systems Group
Advanced Light Source
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

Title: "Soft X-rays, Soft Matter and Software"

We need sharper tools in order to discover, understand, and control complex phenomena and architectures for Soft Matter. Over the past a few years, we have developed Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering (RSoXS) and constructed the first dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering beamline at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL. RSoXS combines soft x-ray spectroscopy with traditional hard x-ray scattering thus offers statistical information for 3D chemical morphology over a large length scale range from nanometers to micrometers. Using RSoXS to characterize multi-length scale soft matter with heterogeous chemical structures, we have demonstrated that soft x-ray scattering is a unique complementary technique to conventional hard x-ray and neutron scattering. Its unique chemical sensitivity, large accessible size scale, molecular bond orientation sensitivity with polarized x-rays and high coherence have shown great potential for chemical/morphological structure characterization for many classes of materials. In addition we developed high performance software to simulate and analysis to address the large amount of data created.

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IME Seminar 6/26 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Laurie Mlinar and Gurdaman Khaira

Date

June 26, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Laurie Mlinar, Tirrell Group

Title: "Targeting Atherosclerosis: Design of a Peptide Amphiphile Micelle Delivery System"

Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerotic plaque formation occurs over the course of decades, progressing through numerous stages of development. To this end, we have designed, developed, and characterized both in vitro and in vivo a peptide amphiphile micelle construct that specifically binds to a marker of early-stage atherosclerotic plaques and will be discussed in this seminar.


Speaker: Gurdaman Khaira, de Pablo Group

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IME Special Seminar: Melina Blees - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Melina Blees

Date

June 27, 2014
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Melina Blees
Cornell University

Title: "Graphene Kirigami"

In the last few years, scientists and engineers have begun to borrow design principles from the paper arts of origami and kirigami. This multidisciplinary approach is already proving its potential in everything from medicine to satellite engineering. Graphene, an extraordinarily strong atom-thick sheet, serves as an ideal starting material for bringing these design ideas down to the nanoscale. We have developed a technique to lift graphene into water, where we can manipulate it like a sheet of paper. This allows us to measure the out-of-plane bending stiffness of graphene, a fundamental mechanical property that has never been conclusively measured at the micron scale. We see a stiffness orders of magnitude higher than the atomic-scale value, and show that this surprising result can be explained by theories of thermally induced fluctuations. The thermally stiffened graphene behaves like paper, which allows us to directly apply designs from the paper art of kirigami to create three-dimensional structures and moving parts. We demonstrate robust stretchable electrodes and extraordinarily resilient hinges. We show that we can control graphene devices directly with micromanipulators or remotely with magnetic fields and lasers. Graphene kirigami’s extraordinary mechanical and electrical properties make it promising for a variety of applications, from force sensors to biocompatible electrical readouts. This simple but powerful approach to creating graphene metamaterials promises diverse, resilient moving parts at the nanoscale.

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IME Seminar: Randy Ewoldt - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Randy Ewoldt

Date

July 10, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Randy Ewoldt
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Title: "Molecular features inferred from macroscopic rheology: asymptotically-nonlinear LAOStrain (large-amplitude oscillatory shear strain)"

Rheological fluid properties generally require high-dimensional descriptions of the nonlinear material behavior. Here, we develop a paradigm for using low-dimensional, asymptotically-nonlinear rheology to better understand soft materials. The experimental technique is based on oscillatory simple shear deformation.  After describing the theory, I will demonstrate the utility of the framework with two case studies: a transient polymer gel network (PVA-Borax in water) and a thixotropic jammed soft particle suspension (Carbopol 940 in water).  In both cases, experimental measurements present novel rheological signatures that have not been predicted by existing constitutive models. Constitutive models are developed and analytically solved for the asymptotically-nonlinear signatures in each case. The work has implications for (i) conceptual understanding of nonlinear mechanical responses, (ii) constitutive model selection, and (iii) inverse problems to probe microstructural and molecular features of structurally-complex soft materials.


Randy H. Ewoldt obtained his Ph.D. and S.M. in Mechanical Engineering at MIT (co-advised by McKinley and Hosoi), and B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and Iowa State University. After a post-doctoral position at the University of Minnesota (advised by Macosko), he joined the faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2011. His group studies rheology, fluid mechanics, and design of complex fluids including yield stress fluids, polymer gels, and biological materials. He has been honored with a Distinguished Young Rheologist Award from TA Instruments (2013), the Gold Medal from ASME/Pi Tau Sigma (2013), a 3M Nontenured Faculty Award (2014), a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation (2014), a DuPont Young Professor Award (2014), and the Arthur B. Metzner Early Career Award from The Society of Rheology (2014).

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IME Seminar 7/24 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Julio Armas-Perez and Shuangjun Chen

Date

July 24, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Julio C. Armas-Perez
de Pablo Group

Title: "Self-assembly of colloids on LC bipolar droplets through a Monte Carlo optimization."

 


 

Speaker: Shuangjun Chen
Nealey Group

Title: “Ionic liquid promotes the phase separation of P(S-b-PMMA) block copolymer in weak segregation regime and its application in directed self-assembly.”

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IME Seminar: Jelena Klinovaja - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Jelena Klinovaja

Date

July 25, 2014
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Jelena Klinovaja
Department of Physics
Harvard University

Title: "Exotic Bound States in Low Dimensions: Majorana Fermions and Parafermions"

Recent results on exotic bound states in one-dimensional condensed matter systems have attracted wide attention due to their promise of non-Abelian statistics useful for topological quantum computing. For example, Majorana fermions can emerge in a variety of setups, so the search for an ideal system to unambiguously observe them still continues. Here, I will discuss candidate materials such as semiconducting Rashba nanowires, graphene nanoribbons, atomic magnetic chains or magnetic semiconduct ors. At the same time, much e­ffort is invested in identifying systems that host even more exotic quasiparticles than Majorana fermions – parafermions. Generating such quasiparticles is a crucial step towards a more powerful Fibonacci braid statistics Fibonacci braid statistics that enables universal topological quantum computing.

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IME Seminar 8/21 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Seminar: Lucas Antony and Lorraine Leon

Date

August 21, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Lucas Antony
de Pablo Group

Title: "Vapor Deposited Ethylbenzene Glasses a Molecular Description"

During recent years there has been growing interest in producing organic glasses via vapor deposition, which yields comparatively more stable glasses than normal annealing methods. This study analyzes the structural differences between these two types of methods for ethylbenzene glasses using a simulated protocol that mimics vapor deposition.

 


 

Speaker: Lorraine Leon
Tirrell Lab

Title: "Chirality-selected phase behavior in ionic polypeptide complexes"

Electrostatically driven polymer self-assembly mechanisms offer unique opportunities for both encapsulation of charged therapeutics and controlled delivery via the tailoring of intermolecular interactions using pH and salt. This study investigates the effect of chirality on the resultant solid or liquid character of self-assembled polyelectrolyte complexes formed from oppositely charged polypeptides in both bulk and nanoscale materials.  In addition, we explore the use of these modular assemblies as gene delivery vehicles.

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AIMR 1st Joint Research Center Workshop - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: AIMR 1st Joint Research Center Workshop

Date

September 18, 2014
8:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Location

AIMR Building, Tohoku University; Sendai, Japan

Details

The Advanced Institute for Materials Research (AIMR) at Tohoku University is hosting professors from IME to discuss collaborations between the two research departments.

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NMS Patterning Review - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: NMS Patterning Review

Date

September 22, 2014
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Location

Gleacher Center Room 400

Details

Prof. Juan de Pablo and Prof. Paul Nealey, in conjunction with Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC), will host NMS Patterning Review at the Gleacher Center on September 22nd and 23rd .  Over 15 students from universities across the country will present their research to industry leaders.  Through this two day workshop, SRC member companies and funding organizations secure access to the industry’s next big thing as well as small innovations waiting to be discovered.  SRC is the world's leading technology research consortium, with member companies and university research programs spanning the globe.  SRC-sponsored university research is of the highest caliber and creates knowledge breakthroughs that will invent the industries of tomorrow.

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2014 IME Annual Picnic - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Annual Picnic

Date

September 25, 2014
12:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Location

Snell Quad

Details

IME will be hosting its annual picnic, potluck style! All IME Faculty, Staff, and Students are welcome, each lab has been assigned a different part of the meal to provide.

Events include food, drink, music, raffle, bingo, and sumo wrestling.

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IME Special Seminar: Chris G. Van de Walle - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Chris G. Van de Walle

Date

September 29, 2014
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Location

KCBD 1103

Details

Speaker: Chris G. Van de Walle
Herbert Kroemer Chair in Materials Science
University of California, Santa Barbara

Title: "Oxides for Energy and Electronics"

Wide-band-gap oxides have many unique properties that make them ideally suited for applications in energy technologies.  They are transparent in the visible, but can be doped to near-metallic conductivities, enabling use as contact layers to optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes.  They can also be used, passively, in energy-efficient window coatings, or actively in smart windows or transparent electronics for displays.  When grown as high-quality heterostructures, oxide-based transistors can be used in power electronics that boost the efficiency of power conversion, currently a large source of loss in applications ranging from hybrid cars to data centers.  Complex oxides (containing transition metals or rare-earth elements) offer the prospect of revolutionary new electronic devices.  I will discuss how cutting-edge first-principles calculations provide key information about materials properties and enable designing new materials combinations for specific applications.

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IME Special Seminar: Hannes Bernien - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Hannes Bernien

Date

September 30, 2014
2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Hannes Bernien
Kavli Institute of Nanoscience
Delft, Netherlands

Title: "Quantum networks with spins in diamond: From remote entanglement to unconditional quantum teleportation"

We present our recent results towards the realization of scalable quantum networks with solid-state qubits. We have entangled two remote spin qubits, each associated with a single nitrogen vacancy center in diamond [1]. This connection between distant nodes of the network is used to transfer an arbitrary quantum state via unconditional teleportation [2].

[1] H. Bernien et al., Nature 497, 86 (2013).
[2] W. Pfaff et al., Science 345, 532 (2014).

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: David Wineland - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: David Wineland

Date

October 2, 2014
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Location

Breasted Hall, The Oriental Institute

Details

Speaker: David Wineland
National Institute of Standards and Technology

Title: "Quantum state manipulation of trapped ions"

Research on precise control of quantum systems occurs in many laboratories, for fundamental research, precise standards, new measurement techniques, and more recently for quantum information processing. I will briefly describe the NIST ion group’s projects in these areas, but these only serve as examples of similar work being performed in many other laboratories around the world.

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IME Special Seminar: Joachim Spatz and Peer Fischer - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Joachim Spatz and Peer Fischer

Date

October 6, 2014
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Joachim Spatz

Title: “Synthetic Assembly and Control of Cell Functions“

BIO-SKETCH: Joachim P. Spatz joined the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems as a Director for the Dept. of New Materials and Biosystems in 2004 (former MPI for Metals Research). From this time on he is also a Full Professor at the University of Heidelberg and head of the Dept. of Biophysical Chemistry. He was an Associated Professor for Biophysical Chemistry at the University of Heidelberg from 2000-2004. From 1999-2000 he received his habilitation in Physics at the University of Ulm. He was a PostDoc in the group of Professor Jacques Prost at the Institut Curie, Paris, in 1997 and 1998. He received his Diploma in Physics (1994) and his Ph.D. in Physics (1996) from the University of Ulm under the supervision of Prof. Möller (now at DWI & RWTH Aachen).

Speaker: Peer Fischer

Title: "3D hybrid nanostructures and nanorobot propulsion in biological fluids“

BIO-SKETCH: Peer Fischer is a Professor of Physical Chemistry at the University of Stuttgart and he heads the Micro Nano and Molecular Systems Lab at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart. Peer Fischer received a BSc. degree in Physics from Imperial College London and a Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge. He was a visiting scientist at the European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy in Florence (LENS) and a NATO Postdoctoral Fellow at Cornell University, before joining the Rowland Institute at Harvard. At Harvard he held a Rowland Junior Research Fellowship and directed an interdisciplinary research lab for five years. In 2011 he moved his lab to the Max-Planck-Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart, where he is an independent, tenured PI

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Workshop for Molecular Imaging - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Workshop for Molecular Imaging

Date

October 27, 2014
8:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Location

Argonne National Laboratory

Details

2014 NTU/ ANL/ IME Molecular Imaging Workshops

Introduction

The field of molecular imaging emerged in the early 1990’s as scientists from multiple disciplines began working toward the development of imaging instruments, imaging probes, and quantification techniques to understand molecular mechanisms in biology and medicine. Since then, the field of molecular imaging developed an impressive number of technologies widely used today for biomedical and materials research and clinical analysis. While the fundamental scaling limits of these technologies have not been reached, each imaging modality has characteristic disadvantages related to their limited spatial resolution, sensitivity and/or temporal response. Continuing quest for novel molecular imaging technologies demands extensive cross-disciplinary collaboration.

With the purpose of establishing an international collaboration between the Molecular Imaging Center at National Taiwan University (NTU), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the Institute of Molecular Engineering (IME) of the University of Chicago, an exploratory workshop was carried out in May, 2014 in Taibei attended by more than 20 scientists from three institutions. The second workshop will be held in Chicago on October 27 and 28, 2014.

The scientific focus of the workshops will be centered on the theme of “Molecular Imaging Systems” with a goal to build a platform to investigate and develop new technologies for imaging molecules and their activity. It will require the collaboration of scientists from a range of disciplines who are able to design and fabricate materials-based imaging agents, are knowledgeable about imaging techniques, and have an in-depth understanding of biochemistry, soft matter physics, and nano-patterning. These meetings will provide a forum for the discussion of novel concepts as a means to identify future collaborative research directions and potential sources of research funding.

Specific Workshop Objectives:

• To initiate discussions between ANL, IME and NTU scientists in search of new ways to capitalize on the unique expertise and technologies existing at the participant institutions. 
• To identify and discuss a range of critical technical issues, including potential fundamental barriers and limitations, pertinent to the demonstration, development, optimization, and use of molecular imaging systems.
• To identify and assess possible approaches to the development of novel capabilities and the required associated areas of research; and
• To identify and discuss potential high-payoff applications to solve major technological problems of global significance, and continually inspire creative applications of molecular-level science.

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UCISTEM and Pheonix Biology present Inaugural Undergraduate Research Symposium - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: UCISTEM and Pheonix Biology present Inaugural Undergraduate Research Symposium

Date

October 27, 2014
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Location

GCIS Atrium

Details

UCISTEM & Phoenix Biology jointly present the inaugural UChicago Undergraduate Research Symposium and Lecture on Monday, October 27th from 2-5 PM in the GCIS Atrium.

Undergraduate Research Symposium: 2:00-4:00 PM
Keynote Lecture: 4:00-5:00 PM
Keynote Speaker: Dr. Steven J. Sibener
Director, University of Chicago’s Institute for Molecular Engineering Water Research Initiative

Undergraduate Research Symposium
A scholarly poster symposium highlighting the research endeavors of University of Chicago’s Undergraduate Population.

We highly encourage all faculty, staff and students to attend. The symposium is free and open to the public; hors d'oeuvres and refreshments will be served.

Come out and present your research to students and distinguished faculty from all scientific departments!

Biography: Dr. Steven J. Sibener, the Carl William Eisendrath Distinguished Service Professor in Chemistry and The James Franck Institute at the University of Chicago, and Director of the University of Chicago’s Institute for Molecular Engineering Water Research Initiative, has made seminal contributions to a wide variety of forefront areas of modern chemistry encompassing chemical physics, surface and materials chemistry, catalytic reaction kinetics, polymeric systems, and nanoscience. His contributions have focused on elucidating the atomic-level dynamical properties of interfaces, as well as the chemical processes and transformations that occur on such interfaces. Molecular beam scattering, scanning probe microscopy imaging, numerical simulations and theory all play prominent roles in his research. He is especially proud of the accomplishments achieved by the many outstanding postdoctoral fellows, graduate, undergraduate, and high school students who have participated in his research program.

 

Please plan to join us for this exciting event! Space is limited; registration is required! To register for the lecture, click here.

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Ashutosh Chilkoti - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Ashutosh Chilkoti

Date

November 6, 2014
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Ashutosh Chilkoti
Theo Pilkington Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Director, Center for Biologically Inspired Materials and Material Systems
Duke University

Title: "Translating Molecular Bioengineering from the Lab to the Patient"

This talk will highlight recent work from my laboratory that illustrates the clinical translation of molecular bioengineering technologies for point-of-care clinical diagnostics and drug delivery. I will discuss a point-of-care diagnostic that we have developed, in which all reagents are printed and stored on a “non-fouling”—protein and cell resistant—polymer brush.  The D4 assay, involves four sequential events: (1) Dispense (droplet of blood); (2) Dissolve (printed reagents on chip); (3) Diffuse (across surface); and (4) Detect (binding event).  Examples of quantitative dose-response from whole blood and the integration of the assay with a smart phone compatible detector will be presented.  In the area of drug delivery, I will highlight two orthogonal designs of genetically encoded peptide polymers—nanoparticles and gels—for drug delivery in two different therapeutic arenas—cancer and type-2 diabetes. In the first design, I will discuss a general method, attachment-triggered self-assembly of recombinant peptide polymers, that packages small hydrophobic molecules into soluble polymer nanoparticles. Because many cancer chemotherapeutics are insoluble small molecules with poor bioavailability, this approach has great utility to increase the solubility, plasma half-life and tumor accumulation of many cancer chemotherapeutics. In the second example, I will discuss an injectable delivery system—Protease Operated Depot (POD)—based on thermally sensitive polypeptides for the sustained and tunable release of peptide drugs from a subcutaneous injection site.
 

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IME Molecular Mixer - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Molecular Mixer

Date

November 6, 2014
4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Location

GCIS Atrium

Details

All IME students, faculty, and staff are invited to our first Science in the Spotlight Molecular Mixer!

Wine! Food! Glamour! Red carpet photos! Live music!

Black tie or lab coats encouraged but not required.

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IME Special Seminar 11/14 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Danna Freedman

Date

November 14, 2014
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Danna Freedman
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemistry
Northwestern University

Title: Scientific Challenges at the Intersection of Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry and Condensed Matter Physics: Qubits and Magnets

​Structure/function correlations underlie both inorganic chemistry and condensed matter physics. The Freedman group pursues questions at this intersection from an inorganic chemistry perspective. Primarily, we focus on synthesis and characterization of compounds that can answer interesting questions commonly viewed as the purview of physics. Research on two areas will be presented: quantum information processing and magnetic anisotropy.

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IME Special Seminar 11/19 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Jack Harris

Date

November 20, 2014
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Jack Harris
Associate Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Yale University

Title: "Observing quantum effects in the motion of a millimeter-scale object"

One of the major challenges in physics is to understand how the classical behavior of macroscopic objects emerges from constituents whose behavior is fundamentally quantum mechanical. The field of optomechanics attempts to address this issue by studying the quantum behavior of devices in which a macroscopic object’s motion is coupled to the photons stored in an optical cavity. In the past few years, experiments have demonstrated a number of quantum effects in these devices, including ground-state cooling, entanglement, and the quantum back-action of displacement measurements. I will give an overview of our group's recent work in this area. I will also describe results from an optomechanical device that exploits the unique properties of superfluid helium. Lastly, I will discuss the prospects for using superfluids to reach previously inaccessible regimes of quantum optomechanics.

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IME Special Seminar 11/21/14 - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Eilon M. Adar

Date

November 21, 2014
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Eilon M. Adar
Alain Poher Chair in Hydrogeology and Arid Zones
Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research
Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Sede Boqer Campus

Title: "Overcoming Water Scarcity in the Middle East: The Israeli Approach"

Demand and the actual consumption of water in Israel and the Middle East are far beyond the annual rate of replenishment, exceeding the safe yield. All major water sources, rivers, streams and groundwater aquifers in the Middle East cross international boundaries. The Jordan River water is used by Jordan, Lebanon and Israel, while the Coastal Mediterranean and mountainous aquifers are exploited by both Israel and the Palestinian Authority. Extensive unilateral development of scarce cross-border water resources could potentially serve as a major trigger for international conflict over maintaining the rights to adequate water for all users.

Will the conventional policy of Water Saving & Increasing Water-Use Efficiency enable humanity to avoid water shortages and provide water security? At most, it will only temporarily mitigate water scarcity. We shall not be able to meet the increasing demand for water (and food) by simply improving water-use efficiency. One cannot sustain the water and food supply with a diminishing amount of water and a continuously growing population. Therefore, it is not surprising that the prevailing sense in Israel is that water is regarded more as commodity rather than a resource. Accordingly, novel water innovations and technologies have been introduced to mitigate water scarcity and to secure a sufficient and adequate water supply. In Israel, this was achieved by:

  1. Improving water utilization efficiency: irrigation & water application; water reuse; water management: supply and quality.
  2. New water: Reclaimed treated sewage and massive seawater and groundwater desalination.

In spite of the apparent risk of conflict triggered by the scarcity of such a commodity, the presentation demonstrates how water scarcity has been used as a catalyst for co-operation on water-related issues.

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IME Undergraduate Summer Research Luncheon - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Undergraduate Summer Research Luncheon

Date

November 21, 2014
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Location

West Lounge, Ida Noyes

Details

The luncheon will provide the opportunity to learn more about IME research opportunities, how to prepare for them, and how to apply for them. Students will also be able to meet and engage with IME faculty. To RSVP, contact Jennifer Oh in Career Advancement.

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Martin Zanni - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Martin Zanni

Date

December 4, 2014
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Location

Center for Care and Discovery 7th floor Boardroom

Details

Speaker: Martin Zanni
Meloche-Bascom Professor
Department of Chemistry
University of Wisconsin–Madison

Title: "Exciton transport in carbon nanotube photovoltaics using 2D White-Light Spectroscopy"

It is now possible to construct mesoscale films made entirely from semiconducting carbon nanotubes. These films are exciting materials for next generation photovoltaics and electronics. We are studying their exciton transport properties using femtosecond 2D White-Light spectroscopy that maps the photoexcitation dynamics as the energy moves through the film. We observe exciton hopping, exciton dissociation, and anti-correlated energy levels, which have important implications for their use in optoelectronics.

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2014 IME Holiday Party - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Holiday Party

Date

December 12, 2014
3:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Location

Chicago Innovation Exchange

Details

Please RSVP by December 5th to Chelcia Kennedy from the calendar invite included with the email invite.

There will be food, drinks, games, and more! If you have any dietary restrictions or any questions please send an email to Chelcia.

Located at the Chicago Innovation Exchange:
1452 East 53rd Street, 2nd Floor Chicago, IL 60615
Enter through the main door on 1452 East 53rd OR you may come in through the Harper Theatre located on 5238 S Harper Ave, Chicago, IL 60615.

PARKING:
There is a surface lot on the West side of Harper Ave—right across the street from Harper Court that has 50 parking spaces. There is parking available on the Harper Court private drive, the interior street in the middle of the property which can accommodate about 20 cars in the form of pay box parking and a 15 minute loading zone. Additionally, Harper Court also has a public parking garage on Lake Park Avenue between 53rd street and 52nd street—there are two levels of parking with over 220 spaces available.

CIE Shuttle:
This shuttle stops near the Chicago Innovation Exchange (CIE) at Harper Avenue and 53rd Street on :15 and :45 every hour between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. The shuttle travels from the CIE and stops at Ellis Avenue/57th Street, Biological Sciences Division (57th Street and Drexel Avenue), Logan Center (on 60th Street), UChicago Law School (on 60th Street) and Booth (Woodlawn Avenue and 58th Street) and back to the CIE.

53rd Express:
The shuttle will operate from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, except on University holidays. The shuttle’s route begins at Ellis Garage at 7 a.m. and travels counter-clockwise around campus. This shuttle will only pick up and drop off passengers at the designated stops along the route. The shuttle stops include: Ellis Garage, Levi Hall, 60th Street/Ellis Ave, Press Building, 57th Street/Stony Island Avenue, and Harper Court.

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Julio Ottino - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Julio Ottino

Date

January 8, 2015
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Julio Ottino
Dean, Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Distinguished Robert R. McCormick Institute Professor
Walter P. Murphy Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Northwestern University

Title: "Myths of Creativity in Art, Science and Technology"

The creative process is essential in the highest human endeavors: art, science and technology. But how do these areas approach, harness, and ultimately use creativity to advance our lives? Though each lies in its own realm of creation – technology works to create new inventions, science unveils new knowledge about the universe, and art finds new ways to express what it means to be human – perhaps each realm can learn from the creative processes of the others. There are lessons can be transferred across domains, but increased understanding is necessary before transfer becomes possible. Currently each side romanticizes the creative process of the others, particularly over the last two centuries. A historical perspective is useful in understanding how these areas separated, how myths emerged, and how we might close the gap between them.

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Nadya Mason - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Nadya Mason

Date

February 5, 2015
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Nadya Mason
Associate Professor
Department of Physics
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Title: "Designing Superconductivity: Manipulating Interactions in Arrays of Superconducting Islands"

One of the most fundamental questions in physics is how the macroscopic properties of matter emerge from microscopic constituents. Often, complex electronic correlations at the micro-scale act to create remarkable macroscopic materials properties, such as superconductivity and ferromagnetism. But the parameters relevant to understanding and manipulating these correlations are difficult to access. In this talk, I will discuss a “bottom-up” approach to studying collective effects in matter via nanostructured arrays of superconducting islands. We fabricate large arrays of superconducting islands patterned on normal metal films; by changing the size and configuration of the islands, we can to tune the parameters relevant to 2D superconductivity, such as disorder, dissipation, and phase separation. I will discuss electrical transport measurements of these systems, including characterization of the superconducting transitions, vortex dynamics in finite magnetic-fields, and evidence that the system approaches an unusual metallic ground state as the island spacing is increased. I will also discuss the mechanism behind the suppression of superconductivity in individual granular islands, even at large diameters.

About:

Nadya Mason received her bachelor’s degree in physics from Harvard University in 1995 and her doctorate in physics from Stanford University in 2001. She engaged in postdoctoral research at Harvard University, where she was a Junior Fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows. Dr. Mason joined the Department of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as an assistant professor in 2005, and was promoted to associate professor in 2011. A condensed matter experimentalist, Dr. Mason focuses on electron behavior in low-dimensional materials such as nanowires, graphene, and nano-structured superconductors. Her research is relevant to the fundamental physics of small systems, as well as to applications involving nano-scale electronic elements. In addition to maintaining a rigorous research program and teaching, Dr. Mason works to increase diversity in the physical sciences, embracing opportunities to encourage and mentor aspiring scientists from underrepresented groups and to promote a welcoming climate within the field. Dr. Mason was a recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2007, was named a 2008 Emerging Scholar by Diverse Issues in Higher Education magazine, the 2009 Denise Denton Emerging Leader Award, and the 2012 Maria Goeppert Mayer Award of the American Physical Society (APS). She is a General Councillor of the APS as well as Chair of the APS Committee on Minorities.

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Molecular Mixer - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Molecular Mixer

Date

February 5, 2015
4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Location

KCBD, South Lobby (Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery, 900 East 57th Street)

Details

Come join IME and our First Thursday Distinguished Colloquium Speaker, Nadya Mason, for our next Molecular Mixer. It's a great opportunity to meet other members of the IME community and enjoy food and drinks!

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The Energy Policy Institute at Chicago Presents: EPIC Lunch Series - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: The Energy Policy Institute at Chicago Presents: EPIC Lunch Series

Date

February 9, 2015
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Location

Saieh Hall, Room 112

Details

Date: Monday, February 9, 2015

Time: 12:00PM-1:00PM

Speaker: Matthew Tirrell, Pritzker Director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering, Senior Scientist, Argonne National Laboratory

Topic: Molecular Engineering of Water Resources

Location: Saieh Hall, Room 112.  Lunch will be provided.

Biography:  Professor Tirrell received a BS degree in Chemical Engineering from Northwestern University and a PhD in Polymer Science and Engineering from the University of Massachusetts. He began his academic career as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering at the University of Minnesota where he later served as Head of the Department. He then moved to the University of California at Santa Barbara where he served as Dean of Engineering. After serving as Dean for 10 years, Professor Tirrell moved to the University of California at Berkeley where he served as Chair for the Department of Bioengineering. In 2011 he accepted the position of Founding Pritzker Director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering.

Research: Matthew Tirrell is a pioneering researcher in the fields of biomolecular engineering and nanotechnology, specializing in the manipulation and measurement of the surface properties of polymers, materials that consist of long, flexible chain molecules. His work combines microscopic measurements of intermolecular forces with the creation of new structures. His work has provided new insight into polymer properties, especially surface phenomena, such as adhesion, friction, and biocompatibility, and new materials based on self-assembly of synthetic and bioinspired materials.

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COMPUTATIONS IN SCIENCE SEMINAR - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Computations in Science Seminar: Giulia Galli

Date

February 11, 2015
12:15 PM - 1:00 PM

Location

KPTC 206

Details

Speaker: Giulia Galli

Title: "Materials discovery and scientific design by computation: a revolution still in the making"

The need of advanced materials for sustainable energy resources and next generation information technology requires the development of integrated scientific strategies, encompassing theoretical innovations, and computational and laboratory experiments. Substantial progress has been made in the last two decades in understanding and predicting the fundamental properties of materials and molecular systems from first principles, i.e. from numerical solutions of the basic equations of quantum mechanics. However the field of ab initio predictions is in its infancy; some formidable theoretical and computational challenges lie ahead of us, including the collection and use of data generated by simulations. We will describe recent progress and successes obtained in predicting properties of matter by quantum simulations, and discuss algorithmic challenges in connection with the use of evolving high-performance computing architectures. We will also discuss open issues related to the validation of the approximate, first principles theories used in large-scale quantum simulations.

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IME Special Seminar: Gregory B. Olson - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Gregory B. Olson

Date

February 17, 2015
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Gregory B. Olson
Walter P. Murphy Professor of Materials Science and Engineering
Northwestern University & QuesTek Innovations LLC

Title: "Genomic Materials Design: From Metals to Polymers"

The numerical implementation of established materials science principles in the form of purposeful engineering tools has brought a new level of integration of the science and engineering of materials. Built on a system of fundamental databases now known as the Materials Genome, parametric materials design has integrated materials science, applied mechanics and quantum physics within a systems engineering framework to create a first generation of designer "cyberalloys" that have now entered successful commercial applications. Building on these successes, the visionary DARPA-AIM initiative broadened computational materials engineering to address acceleration of the full materials development and qualification cycle. Integration with the full suite of fundamental databases and models has demonstrated the historic milestone of greatly accelerated flight qualification for two aircraft landing gear steels, already meeting the technology acceleration goals of the national Materials Genome Initiative (MGI). In further support of the MGI, the new NIST-sponsored Chicago-regional CHiMaD Center for Hierarchical Materials Design expands the scope of genomic materials design across materials classes. Pilot projects in the adaptation of physical metallurgy principles to polymer design have included case-hardenable rubber-toughened epoxies for gear application, and the extension of TRIP steel concepts to the design of high-performance PVAC-based bubble gum.

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IME Special Seminar: Stuart Rowan - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Stuart Rowan

Date

February 19, 2015
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Location

KCBD 1103

Details

Speaker: Stuart Rowan
Kent H. Smith Professor of Engineering
Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering
Case Western Reserve University

Title: "Using Dynamic Chemistry as a Route to New Stimuli-Responsive Materials"

The dynamic bond can be defined as any class of bond that selectively undergoes reversible breaking and reformation, usually under equilibrium conditions. The incorporation of dynamic bonds (which can be either covalent or non-covalent) allows access to structurally dynamic polymers. Such polymers can exhibit macroscopic responses upon exposure to an environmental stimulus, on account of a rearrangement of the polymeric architecture.  In such systems the nature of the dynamic bond not only dictates which stimulus the material will be responsive to but also plays a role in the response itself. Thus such a design concept represents a molecular level approach to the development of new stimuli-responsive materials. We have been interested in the potential of such systems to access new material platforms and have developed a range of new mechanically stable, supramolecular structurally dynamic polymer films that change their properties in response to a given stimulus, such as temperature, light or specific chemicals. Such supramolecular materials have been targeted toward applications that include healable plastics, responsive liquid crystalline polymers, chemical sensors, thermally responsive hydrogels, shape memory materials and mechanically dynamic biomedical implants. In this presentation we will focus on two classes of stimuli-responsive materials (1) photo-healable/shape-memory materials and (2) mechanically dynamic cortical implants.

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IME Special Seminar: Alexander Dunn - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Alexander Dunn

Date

February 25, 2015
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Alexander Dunn
Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering
Stanford University

Title: "Visualizing the architecture of cellular adhesion complexes using fluorescent molecular force sensors"

Here I describe how we used FRET-based molecular tension sensors to visualize the nanometer-scale structures that link cells to the extracellular matrix. These observations, together with those from related projects investigating the biophysical basis for the sense of touch and mechanotransduction at cell-cell junctions, suggest a common biophysical framework for understanding how cells detect and respond to mechanical stimuli.

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Paul Alivisatos - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Paul Alivisatos

Date

April 2, 2015
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Paul Alivisatos
Samsung Distinguished Professor of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science & Engineering
Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
University of California, Berkeley

Title: “Studies of colloidal nanocrystals in liquids using the transmission electron microscope”

We have developed a graphene liquid cell for the transmission electron microscope, in which a thin specimen of liquid, ~100nm in thickness, is encapsulated by two windows of graphene.  In this cell we can observe motions and dynamics of nanocrystals, DNA directed nanocrystal assemblies, and protein shells and capsids.  We are able to observe the growth of colloidal nanocrystals, as well as the structure of individual nanocrystals at a high level of detail.

About Prof. Alivisatos:

Dr. Paul Alivisatos is Director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and is the University of California (UC) Berkeley’s Samsung Distinguished Professor of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. He also directs the Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute (ENSI), and holds professorships in UC Berkeley’s departments of materials science and chemistry. In addition, he is a founder of two prominent nanotechnology companies, Nanosys and Quantum Dot Corp, now a part of Life Tech.

Groundbreaking contributions to the fundamental physical chemistry of nanocrystals are the hallmarks of Dr. Alivisatos’s distinguished career. His research breakthroughs include the synthesis of size- and shape-controlled nanoscrystals, and forefront studies of nanocrystal properties, including optical, electrical, structural and thermodynamic. In his research, he has demonstrated key applications of nanocrystals in biological imaging and renewable energy. He played a critical role in the establishment of the Molecular Foundry, a U.S. Department of Energy’s Nanoscale Science Research Center; and was the facility’s founding director. He is the founding editor of Nano Letters, a leading scientific publication in nanoscience.

Dr. Alivisatos has been recognized for his accomplishments, with awards such as the Wolf Prize in Chemistry, the Linus Pauling Medal, the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award, the Eni Italgas Prize for Energy and Environment, the Rank Prize for Optoelectronics, the Wilson Prize, the Coblentz Award for Advances in Molecular Spectroscopy, the American Chemical Society Award for Colloid and Surface Science, the Von Hippel Award of the Materials Research Society, and most recently, the 2014 ACS Materials Chemistry Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Dr. Alivisatos received a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry in 1981 from the University of Chicago and Ph.D. in Chemistry from UC Berkeley in 1986. He began his career with UC Berkeley in 1988 and with Berkeley Lab in 1991.

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IME Special Seminar: Ron Naaman - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Ron Naaman

Date

April 13, 2015
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

KCBD 1103 Auditorium

Details

Speaker: Ron Naaman
The Aryeh and Mintzi Katzman Professor
Department of Chemical Physics
Weizmann Institute of Science

Title: "The Chiral Induced Spin Selectivity (CISS) effect- From Electron Transfer in Biology to Spintronics"

Spin based properties, applications, and devices are commonly related to magnetic effects and to magnetic materials. However, we found that chiral organic molecules can act as spin filters for photoelectrons transmission, in electron transfer, and in electron transport.  The effect introduces the ability to utilize quantum mechanical phenomena at room temperature.

The new effect, termed Chiral Induced Spin Selectivity (CISS)  has interesting implications for the production of new types of spintronics devices and on electron transfer in biological systems. The effect was found in bio-molecules and in bio-systems like the photosystem I. It will be shown how the CISS effect makes electron transfer in Biology more efficient and how it may be important in redox reactions. The basic effect, and its applications and implications, will be presented including a quantitative theory that explains the effect.

1. Naaman, R.; Waldeck, D.H. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. (feature)  3, 2178 (2012); Annual Review Phys. Chem. 66 (2015).

About: 

Born in Israel, Prof. Naaman earned his BSc in 1973 from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and his PhD in 1978 from the Weizmann Institute of Science. He worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University in California and spent a year as a Lecturer and Research Associate in the Department of Chemistry at Harvard University. In 1981, Prof. Naaman joined the Weizmann Institute in the Department of Isotope Research (later renamed the Department of Chemical Physics). From 1989 to 1995, Prof. Naaman chaired the Institute’s Chemical Services Unit, and from 1995 to 2000, he headed the Department of Chemical Physics. From 2008 to 2010, Prof. Naaman was the Chair of the Scientific Council at the Institute. Prof. Naaman heads the Nancy and Stephen Grand Research Center for Sensors and Security, is a co-chair of the CNRS-Weizmann NaBi program, and holds the Aryeh and Mintzi Katzman Professorial Chair.

Prof. Naaman studies the electronic properties of organic−inorganic interfaces. He investigates the interaction of electrons with self-assembled monolayers and the electronic interactions within these hybrid structures. His group discovered the Chiral Induced Spin Selectivity (CISS) effect and is utilizing this effect for a new type of electronics which is spin dependent. On the basis of these studies, Prof. Naaman and his group produce
molecular-scale electrical devices and investigate their properties as the basis for a new generation of nanoelectronics and their immediate practical applications as fast, accurate, and highly sensitive sensors.

Prof. Naaman is a fellow of the American Physical Society. In 2007, he was the Lectureship Award Winner of the Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry of the Chemical Society of Japan. From 2008 to 2011, he was a member of the advisory board of the Journal of Physical Chemistry. In 2011 he received the Erasmus Mundus research scholarship at the Technical University Dresden. In 2011, he was also the recipient of the Israel Vacuum Society Research Excellence Prize and is a member of the editorial board of the Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology and the advisory editorial board for the journal Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics.

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IME Special Seminar: Mingjiang Zhong - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Mingjiang Zhong

Date

April 20, 2015
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

KCBD 1103 Auditorium

Details

Speaker: Mingjiang Zhong
Department of Chemistry
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Title: "Engineering Functional Defects in Precisely Synthesized Macromolecules"

The development of living polymerization techniques enables the synthesis of well-defined polymers. The challenge of making living polymerizations environmentally friendly while reaching higher levels of precision remains critical to advances in polymer chemistry. The first part of this seminar introduces solutions to these problems. The second part presents an interdisciplinary approach to quantitatively characterizing defects in polymers of different dimensions.

About: Dr. Mingjiang Zhong grew up in Guiyang, the capital city of Guizhou province, P.R.China. After receiving his B.S. degree in double majors of Chemistry and Mathematics at Peking University under the supervision of Prof. Yun-Dong Wu, he pursued his Ph.D. degree at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) under the direction of Profs. Krzysztof Matyjaszewski and Tomasz Kowalewski. His primary research interests at CMU spanned the subjects of mechanistic study of reversible-deactivation radical polymerization, macromolecular self-assembly, nanocarbon and soft materials for energy storage and conversion applications. In October 2013, he joined the groups of Profs. Jeremiah A. Johnson and Bradley D. Olsen as a joint postdoctoral fellow, where his research will be focused on design and physical characterization of complex polymeric structures such as hydrogels and molecular brushes.

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IME Special Seminar: Massimiliano Di Ventra - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Massimiliano Di Ventra

Date

April 21, 2015
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Massimiliano Di Ventra
Department of Physics
University of California San Diego

Title: "Memcomputing: computing with and in memory using collective states"

I will discuss a novel computing paradigm we named memcomputing [1] inspired by the operation of our own brain which uses (passive) memory circuit elements or memelements [2] as the main tools of operation. I will first introduce the notion of universal memcomputing machines (UMMs) as a class of general-purpose computing machines based on systems with memory. We have shown [3] that the memory properties of UMMs endow them with universal computing power--they are Turing-complete--, intrinsic parallelism, functional polymorphism, and information overhead, namely their collective states can support exponential data compression directly in memory. It is the presence of collective states in UMMs that allows them to solve NP-complete problems in polynomial time using polynomial resources [3]. As an example I will show the polynomial-time solution of the subset-sum problem implemented in a simple hardware architecture that uses standard microelectronic components [4], and the solution of prime factorization using polynomial resources and memristive elements. Even though we have not proved NP=P within the Turing paradigm, the practical implementation of these UMMs would represent a paradigm shift from present von Neumann architectures bringing us closer to brain-like neural computation [5].

[1] M. Di Ventra and Y.V. Pershin, Computing: the Parallel Approach, Nature Physics, 9, 200 (2013).
[2] M. Di Ventra, Y.V. Pershin, and L.O. Chua, Circuit Elements with Memory: Memristors, Memcapacitors, and Meminductors, Proc. IEEE, 97, 1717 (2009).
[3] F. L. Traversa and M. Di Ventra, Universal Memcomputing Machines, IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks and Learning Systems, 99 (2015), DOI: 10.1109/TNNLS.2015.2391182.
[4] F. L. Traversa, C. Ramella, F. Bonani,  and M. Di Ventra, Memcomputing NP-complete problems in polynomial time using polynomial resources and collective states, arXiv:1411.4798
[5] F. L. Traversa, F. Bonani, Y.V. Pershin and M. Di Ventra, Dynamic Computing Random Access Memory, Nanotechnology 25, 285201 (2014).

About:

Massimiliano Di Ventra obtained his undergraduate degree in Physics summa cum laude from the University of Trieste (Italy) in 1991 and did his PhD studies at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland) in 1993-1997. He has been Research Assistant Professor at Vanderbilt University and Visiting Scientist at IBM T.J. Watson Research Center before joining the Physics Department of Virginia Tech in 2000 as Assistant Professor. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 2003 and moved to the Physics Department of the University of California, San Diego, in 2004 where he was promoted to Full Professor in 2006. Di Ventra's research interests are in the theory of electronic and transport properties of nanoscale systems, non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, DNA sequencing/polymer dynamics in nanopores, and memory effects in nanostructures for applications in unconventional computing and biophysics. He has been invited to deliver more than 200 talks worldwide on these topics (including 6 plenary/keynote presentations, 7 talks at the March Meeting of the American Physical Society, 5 at the Materials Research Society, 2 at the American Chemical Society, and 1 at the SPIE). He serves on the editorial board of several scientific journals and has won numerous awards and honors, including the NSF Early CAREER Award, the Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award, fellowship in the Institute of Physics and the American Physical Society. He has published more than 140 papers in refereed journals (13 of these are listed as ISI Essential Science Indicators highly-cited papers of the period 2003-2013), co-edited the textbook Introduction to Nanoscale Science and Technology (Springer, 2004) for undergraduate students, and he is single author of the graduate-level textbook Electrical Transport in Nanoscale Systems (Cambridge University Press, 2008).

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The Promise of Self-Assembling Integrated Circuits with Juan de Pablo - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: Harper Lecture

Date

April 22, 2015
8:00 PM - 10:30 PM

Location

Mexico City, Mexico

Details

"The Promise of Self-Assembling Integrated Circuits with Juan de Pablo"

Do you miss your University days? Debating big ideas with classmates and professors? Harper Lectures bring a little bit of that UChicago experience close to home, as faculty present their exciting new discoveries and unique perspectives. Enjoy the opportunity to learn from renowned scholars, connect with former classmates, and network with alumni, parents, and friends.

Join your fellow alumni at the upcoming Mexico Harper Lecture on Wednesday, April 22, 2015, featuring engineer Juan de Pablo, a Liew Family Professor in Molecular Engineering. De Pablo will describe recent efforts by the Institute for Molecular Engineering to design smart molecules and the potential impact of these breakthrough technologies on the electronics industry.

Do you want to enjoy even more Harper Lectures? The Alumni Association has a growing collection of recorded lectures on their YouTube channel to satisfy your thirst for knowledge at home or in the virtual classroom.

8:00-8:30 p.m.
Registration

8:30-9:45 p.m.
Presentation and discussion

9:45-10:30 p.m.
Reception

Questions?

Contact the University of Chicago Office of Strategic Events at 773.702.7788 or harperlectures@uchicago.edu.

JW Marriott
Andres Bello 29
Mexico City, Mexico
+011 52 55 5999 0000

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IME Special Seminar: Michael Flateé - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Michael Flatté

Date

April 29, 2015
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Location

GCIS W301

Details

Speaker: Michael Flateé
Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy
University of Iowa

Title: "Room-temperature electronic spin correlations: towards spin-coherent technologies"

Large changes in the resistance and luminescence of nonmagnetic conductors in few-Gauss magnetic fields, spin-dependent electromotive forces within nonmagnetic insulators, and voltage-controlled phase shifters for spin waves in magnetic insulators all can arise from spin-coherent quantum dynamics at room temperature.  Device examples will be drawn from materials as disparate as organic semiconductors, oxide tunnel junctions, topological insulators and ferrimagnetic garnets.

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IME Special Seminar: Kazue Kurihara - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Kazue Kurihara

Date

April 29, 2015
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Location

KCBD 1103 Auditorium

Details

Speaker: Kazue Kurihara
Professor, Advanced Institute for Materials Research (AIMR) & Institute for Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM)
Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

Title: "Surface Forces Measurement for Molecular Engineering"

This lecture describes our new approaches of surface forces measurement for molecular engineering: the twin-path surface force apparatus for opaque samples and the resonance shear measurement for studying confined liquids.  Their applications for characterizing solid-liquid interfaces including electrode surfaces, and confined liquids such as a liquid crystal under the applied electric field, ionic liquids and lubricants for tibology will be discussed.

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IME Special Seminar: Menachem Elimelech - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering

Event: IME Special Seminar: Menachem Elimelech

Date

May 5, 2015
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Location

KCBD 1103 Auditorium

Details

Speaker: Menachem Elimelech
Professor, Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Yale University

Title: "High Performance Membranes for Energy-Efficient Desalination and Wastewater Reuse"

Water scarcity is one of the greatest global crises of our time.  Increasing water supply beyond what is available from the hydrological cycle can be achieved by seawater desalination and wastewater reuse.  Highly effective, low-cost, robust technologies for desalination and wastewater reuse are needed, with minimal impact on the environment.  Recent advances in the science and technology of desalination and wastewater reuse will be presented, focusing on membrane-based processes.  Major developments in these technologies are possible due to recent advances in materials science, nanotechnology, and the fundamental understanding of the solid-water interface.  In this presentation, we will show how we can exploit novel nanomaterials to develop better approaches to design and fabricate membrane materials.  By integrating the facile processability, light-weight, and low-cost features of organic polymers with functionality provided by inorganic nanostructures we can develop a new membrane materials platform with applications in desalination and wastewater reuse.  Among the examples that will be discussed in this presentation are the development of antifouling membranes, biofouling-resistant membranes, and next-generation membranes that overcome limitations of existing technologies.

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IME Distinguished Colloquium Series: Zhenan Bao - Events - Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering